Title

How Inclined Bone Surface Can Change Bone Drilling Performance

Poster Number

11

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Second Author Status

5th year Senior

Third Author Major

Bioengineering

Third Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. JuEun Lee

Faculty Mentor Department

Mechanical Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

Bone drilling is a surgical procedure which creates holes in the human skeleton to treat fractures, install implants, and for reconstructive surgery. To ensure success of bone drilling procedures, it is critical to have a fundamental understanding of bone drilling performance during surgery. Current bone drilling studies have reported drilling performance in patients’ bone surfaces that are assumed perpendicular to the direction of the drill’s movement. Commonly, however, drilling is performed on inclined bone surfaces at angles other than 90°, resulting in completely different drilling trends. Hence, it is crucial to understand how inclined bone surfaces can change drilling performance and introduce possible risks from surface irregularity. The objective of this study is to fundamentally understand bone drilling performance at specific surface inclination angles. Specifically, this study aims to investigate forces in bone drilling on inclined bone surface and drilled hole accuracy. Bovine cortical bones were used in this study and were tightly affixed to a fabricated device to create customizable inclined bone surfaces. A series of drilling tests were conducted with a computer numerically controlled machine, and three-component drilling forces were measured using a dynamometer. Hole accuracy was evaluated using a 3D digital microscope. The results reveal that additional forces in lateral directions were observed with inclination, while only vertical force is observed when drilling perpendicular to the bone surface. It was also found that lower inclination angle tests had smaller hole deviations, with reduced lateral forces. This study demonstrated that inclined bone surfaces can cause drill-bit wandering when the drill-bit initially contacts the inclined bone surface. Drill-bit deflection can occur also contributing to hole deviation and additional forces in the lateral directions. The findings of this study can be used to aid surgeons when drilling on an angled bone surface to avoid additional bone damage and drill-bit breakage.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

24-4-2021 1:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2021 2:15 PM

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Apr 24th, 1:00 PM Apr 24th, 2:15 PM

How Inclined Bone Surface Can Change Bone Drilling Performance

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Bone drilling is a surgical procedure which creates holes in the human skeleton to treat fractures, install implants, and for reconstructive surgery. To ensure success of bone drilling procedures, it is critical to have a fundamental understanding of bone drilling performance during surgery. Current bone drilling studies have reported drilling performance in patients’ bone surfaces that are assumed perpendicular to the direction of the drill’s movement. Commonly, however, drilling is performed on inclined bone surfaces at angles other than 90°, resulting in completely different drilling trends. Hence, it is crucial to understand how inclined bone surfaces can change drilling performance and introduce possible risks from surface irregularity. The objective of this study is to fundamentally understand bone drilling performance at specific surface inclination angles. Specifically, this study aims to investigate forces in bone drilling on inclined bone surface and drilled hole accuracy. Bovine cortical bones were used in this study and were tightly affixed to a fabricated device to create customizable inclined bone surfaces. A series of drilling tests were conducted with a computer numerically controlled machine, and three-component drilling forces were measured using a dynamometer. Hole accuracy was evaluated using a 3D digital microscope. The results reveal that additional forces in lateral directions were observed with inclination, while only vertical force is observed when drilling perpendicular to the bone surface. It was also found that lower inclination angle tests had smaller hole deviations, with reduced lateral forces. This study demonstrated that inclined bone surfaces can cause drill-bit wandering when the drill-bit initially contacts the inclined bone surface. Drill-bit deflection can occur also contributing to hole deviation and additional forces in the lateral directions. The findings of this study can be used to aid surgeons when drilling on an angled bone surface to avoid additional bone damage and drill-bit breakage.