Title

Characterization of ROS-1 Fusion Proteins in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Poster Number

6

Lead Author Major

Biochemistry

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Biochemistry

Second Author Status

Junior

Third Author Major

Biology

Third Author Status

Senior

Additional Authors

All authors were equal contributors.***

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Georgios Pantouris

Faculty Mentor Department

Chemistry

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Andrew Parkins

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Chemistry

Abstract/Artist Statement

Cancer is the uncontrolled division of cells that is accompanied by alterations of the human genome. Among these alterations is the formation of pathogenic fusion proteins. Fusion proteins occur when two genes, originally separated, are fused to a single unit with unique functional properties that favor the survival, proliferation and metastasis of malignant cells. In our lab, we focus on the structural and functional characterization of ROS-1 fusions, one of the largest and most lethal fusion families. The ROS-1 fusion family has been linked primarily to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and secondary to brain, soft tissue, gastric, and liver cancer. ROS-1 fusion proteins are mainly found in adult patients with NSCLC and to a lesser extent in pediatric patients. Currently, available therapeutics target the ROS-1 portion of the fusion protein, but drug resistance is usually acquired, rendering these drugs useless after initial treatment. Drugs that target the other member of ROS-1 fusion proteins are not readily available but could potentially target the fusion protein with higher specificity, as ROS-1 shares similar topology with many other kinases. Structural and functional characterization of ROS-1 fusion proteins, with emphasis on the fusion partner, will permit the design and development of new generation therapeutic with antitumor properties.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

24-4-2021 1:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2021 2:15 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 1:00 PM Apr 24th, 2:15 PM

Characterization of ROS-1 Fusion Proteins in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Cancer is the uncontrolled division of cells that is accompanied by alterations of the human genome. Among these alterations is the formation of pathogenic fusion proteins. Fusion proteins occur when two genes, originally separated, are fused to a single unit with unique functional properties that favor the survival, proliferation and metastasis of malignant cells. In our lab, we focus on the structural and functional characterization of ROS-1 fusions, one of the largest and most lethal fusion families. The ROS-1 fusion family has been linked primarily to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and secondary to brain, soft tissue, gastric, and liver cancer. ROS-1 fusion proteins are mainly found in adult patients with NSCLC and to a lesser extent in pediatric patients. Currently, available therapeutics target the ROS-1 portion of the fusion protein, but drug resistance is usually acquired, rendering these drugs useless after initial treatment. Drugs that target the other member of ROS-1 fusion proteins are not readily available but could potentially target the fusion protein with higher specificity, as ROS-1 shares similar topology with many other kinases. Structural and functional characterization of ROS-1 fusion proteins, with emphasis on the fusion partner, will permit the design and development of new generation therapeutic with antitumor properties.