Title

Effects of thermal variation on embryonic development within and across generations

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Second Author Status

Sophomore

Third Author Major

Biological Sciences

Third Author Status

Senior

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Zachary Stahlschmidt

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Variation in temperature associated with climate change may pose a greater risk to species and biodiversity than the gradual warming characterized by shifts in mean temperature. Embryos may be particularly vulnerable to thermal variation because they represent a critical stage of development and are trapped in their microclimates. However, the thermal variability experienced by mothers may influence the size or composition of their eggs thereby mitigating the effects of thermal variation on the development of their offspring. Our research aims to disentangle the effects of thermal variation experienced by adult females and by their embryos on embryonic development. We used a 2 x 2 factorial design to create four treatment groups of eggs from the variable field cricket (Gryllus lineaticeps): (1) eggs laid by females that spent adulthood in a constant 28˚C and that incubate in constant 28˚C, (2) eggs laid by females that spent adulthood in a constant 28˚C and that incubate in fluctuating 28˚C (daily oscillation between 18˚C and 38˚C) (3) eggs laid by females that spent adulthood in a fluctuating 28˚C and that incubate in constant 28˚C, (4) eggs laid by females that spent adulthood in a fluctuating 28˚C and that incubate in fluctuating 28˚C. All eggs were staged thrice weekly, egg survival was determined, and the length, width, and estimated volume of eggs were measured digitally using ImageJ. Our results will inform the potential effects of thermal variation in a widespread taxon (most animals are insects), as well as the transgenerational effects of thermal variation (e.g.,the ability of mothers to adaptively provision their eggs in response to thermal variation).

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

24-4-2021 3:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2021 3:45 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 3:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Effects of thermal variation on embryonic development within and across generations

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Variation in temperature associated with climate change may pose a greater risk to species and biodiversity than the gradual warming characterized by shifts in mean temperature. Embryos may be particularly vulnerable to thermal variation because they represent a critical stage of development and are trapped in their microclimates. However, the thermal variability experienced by mothers may influence the size or composition of their eggs thereby mitigating the effects of thermal variation on the development of their offspring. Our research aims to disentangle the effects of thermal variation experienced by adult females and by their embryos on embryonic development. We used a 2 x 2 factorial design to create four treatment groups of eggs from the variable field cricket (Gryllus lineaticeps): (1) eggs laid by females that spent adulthood in a constant 28˚C and that incubate in constant 28˚C, (2) eggs laid by females that spent adulthood in a constant 28˚C and that incubate in fluctuating 28˚C (daily oscillation between 18˚C and 38˚C) (3) eggs laid by females that spent adulthood in a fluctuating 28˚C and that incubate in constant 28˚C, (4) eggs laid by females that spent adulthood in a fluctuating 28˚C and that incubate in fluctuating 28˚C. All eggs were staged thrice weekly, egg survival was determined, and the length, width, and estimated volume of eggs were measured digitally using ImageJ. Our results will inform the potential effects of thermal variation in a widespread taxon (most animals are insects), as well as the transgenerational effects of thermal variation (e.g.,the ability of mothers to adaptively provision their eggs in response to thermal variation).