Title

MEMO Engineering- The City of Stockton FOG Receiving Station

Lead Author Major

Angelica Ortiz

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Charles Manning

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Amjad Masadeh

Third Author Status

Senior

Fourth Author Major

Kimberly Estipona

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Luke Lee

Faculty Mentor Department

Civil Engineering

Additional Mentors

Deedee Antypas

City of Stockton

Deedee.antypas@stocktonca.gov

Abstract/Artist Statement

FOG (fats, oils, and greases) are organic polar compounds derived from vegetable/plant or animal sources. Generally, FOG materializes as the brown or yellow grease from restaurant grease traps, interceptors, grease recycling bins, and commercial/industrial production waste. FOG is then typically delivered from the source to wastewater treatment facilities or FOG receiving stations by private grease hauling operators. Many wastewater treatment facilities such as Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant in Elk Grove, have reached max capacity on the amount of FOG it can receive and began prohibiting out of county haul trucks to deliver FOG to their facility. Although a FOG receiving facility has recently opened in the city of Manteca, the city of Stockton is rapidly growing, and a need to develop comprehensive solutions to handle the increased amount of FOG that will be generated and to exploit FOG’s many beneficial uses. Currently, the Municipal Utilities Department (MUD) for the City of Stockton, located on Navy Drive, which serves the Stockton community in water treatment and distribution is undergoing a 220 million dollar rehabilitation project to upgrade equipment and infrastructure. The existing Regional Wastewater Control Facility (RWCF) has three-1MG Anaerobic digesters that are not in use but may be put in service under the new plant. MUD envisions utilizing one of the 1MG anaerobic digesters for FOG receival, mixing, processing, energy production, and as a potential revenue source. MEMO Engineering has proposed rehabilitating one of the existing 1MG anaerobic digesters into a FOG receiving station capable of receiving and processing the increased volume of FOG. Rehabilitation will consist of installing new FOG receiving pumps and accessories for the anaerobic digester, installation, and mounting of mixer propellers, access hatch, and an industrial staircase for the service and maintenance of mixers. Design of piping from the station to the digester to the facility’s headworks, as well as analyses of greenhouse gas emission levels (Methane), the conversion of methane to renewable energy, any potential effects to a below-ground monitoring well, and suitability for the increased truck flow will be conducted. We expect the FOG receiving station to reduce MUD’s utility costs through increased digester gas production that will be converted to renewable energy, reduced clogging, and other negative impacts to the overall collection system. It will also improve sustainability, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and generate revenue through fees collected for services provided by the FOG station.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

1-5-2021 8:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2021 5:00 PM

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May 1st, 8:00 AM May 1st, 5:00 PM

MEMO Engineering- The City of Stockton FOG Receiving Station

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

FOG (fats, oils, and greases) are organic polar compounds derived from vegetable/plant or animal sources. Generally, FOG materializes as the brown or yellow grease from restaurant grease traps, interceptors, grease recycling bins, and commercial/industrial production waste. FOG is then typically delivered from the source to wastewater treatment facilities or FOG receiving stations by private grease hauling operators. Many wastewater treatment facilities such as Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant in Elk Grove, have reached max capacity on the amount of FOG it can receive and began prohibiting out of county haul trucks to deliver FOG to their facility. Although a FOG receiving facility has recently opened in the city of Manteca, the city of Stockton is rapidly growing, and a need to develop comprehensive solutions to handle the increased amount of FOG that will be generated and to exploit FOG’s many beneficial uses. Currently, the Municipal Utilities Department (MUD) for the City of Stockton, located on Navy Drive, which serves the Stockton community in water treatment and distribution is undergoing a 220 million dollar rehabilitation project to upgrade equipment and infrastructure. The existing Regional Wastewater Control Facility (RWCF) has three-1MG Anaerobic digesters that are not in use but may be put in service under the new plant. MUD envisions utilizing one of the 1MG anaerobic digesters for FOG receival, mixing, processing, energy production, and as a potential revenue source. MEMO Engineering has proposed rehabilitating one of the existing 1MG anaerobic digesters into a FOG receiving station capable of receiving and processing the increased volume of FOG. Rehabilitation will consist of installing new FOG receiving pumps and accessories for the anaerobic digester, installation, and mounting of mixer propellers, access hatch, and an industrial staircase for the service and maintenance of mixers. Design of piping from the station to the digester to the facility’s headworks, as well as analyses of greenhouse gas emission levels (Methane), the conversion of methane to renewable energy, any potential effects to a below-ground monitoring well, and suitability for the increased truck flow will be conducted. We expect the FOG receiving station to reduce MUD’s utility costs through increased digester gas production that will be converted to renewable energy, reduced clogging, and other negative impacts to the overall collection system. It will also improve sustainability, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and generate revenue through fees collected for services provided by the FOG station.