Title

Left and nationalist movements in Iraq under the Hashemite monarchy

Lead Author Major

International Relations

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Ahmed Kanna

Faculty Mentor Department

Anthropology

Abstract/Artist Statement

This paper aims to examine how left and nationalist movements under the Hashemites in pre-Ba’th Iraq were closely linked to the ideas presented in Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth. Fanon establishes that European settler colonialism and imperialism were becoming obsolete in the second half of the twentieth century. This was the result of a desired emancipation not only by the proletariat, but by the impoverished classes, who composed a majority of the oppressed population. In the age of British imperialism in Iraq — and in other countries in the Middle East, including Egypt and Jordan — which was established by the Sykes-Picot Agreement of 1916, relationships were forged between the local elite of Iraq and the British imperialists. Fanon warns that the most oppressed — the peasantry — would revolt in violent masses. In Iraq, this relationship is drawn through a chronicled history of the Communist party, the Ba’th party, and the Free Officers’ movement, all of whom played a significant role in the overthrow of the oppressive Hashemite monarchy in Iraq. Fanon’s analysis of class structure is also examined to understand the motives for the participation in the violent revolts which occurred in Iraq in the July 1958 Revolution. Also, the revolution may have been considered more of a coup, and jn that sense, a solidification of Fanon’s belief that liberation movements at that time would tend towards the creation of a new elite, ruling class.

Location

Virtual

Start Date

25-4-2020 10:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2020 12:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 10:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

Left and nationalist movements in Iraq under the Hashemite monarchy

Virtual

This paper aims to examine how left and nationalist movements under the Hashemites in pre-Ba’th Iraq were closely linked to the ideas presented in Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth. Fanon establishes that European settler colonialism and imperialism were becoming obsolete in the second half of the twentieth century. This was the result of a desired emancipation not only by the proletariat, but by the impoverished classes, who composed a majority of the oppressed population. In the age of British imperialism in Iraq — and in other countries in the Middle East, including Egypt and Jordan — which was established by the Sykes-Picot Agreement of 1916, relationships were forged between the local elite of Iraq and the British imperialists. Fanon warns that the most oppressed — the peasantry — would revolt in violent masses. In Iraq, this relationship is drawn through a chronicled history of the Communist party, the Ba’th party, and the Free Officers’ movement, all of whom played a significant role in the overthrow of the oppressive Hashemite monarchy in Iraq. Fanon’s analysis of class structure is also examined to understand the motives for the participation in the violent revolts which occurred in Iraq in the July 1958 Revolution. Also, the revolution may have been considered more of a coup, and jn that sense, a solidification of Fanon’s belief that liberation movements at that time would tend towards the creation of a new elite, ruling class.