Title

An Evaluation of Group Behavioral Skills Training to Teach Members of Greek Letter Organizations to Free-Pour Standard Servings of Beer

Poster Number

15A

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Psychology

Second Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Carolynn Kohn

Faculty Mentor Email

ckohn@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Meagan Strickland

Graduate Student Mentor Email

m_strickland@u.pacific.edu

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Psychology

Additional Mentors

Margaret Brock, m_brock1@u.pacific.edu, Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

Excessive drinking among college students is a significant problem that has serious negative consequences. Many members of Greek Letter Organizations (GLO) are more likely to report excessive drinking and increased negative consequences compared to other college students. Students who report experiencing fewer negative consequences as a result of drinking also report counting their drinks as an effective preventive strategy; however, in order to effectively use this strategy, students must be able to identify and pour accurate servings of alcohol. Previous studies have established that individually-taught behavioral skills training (BST) in a laboratory is an effective strategy to train students to accurately free-pour standard servings of beer; however, little is known about the effectiveness of BST when taught in a group format in a more naturalistic setting. We used a nonconcurrent multiple probe design across four weeks to assess the effects of group BST on the accuracy of participants’ pours taught in the GLO setting. We provided BST to participants who failed to pour within 10% of the standard serving of beer (12 oz.) during baseline assessment. Participants from GLO 1 (n = 2) provided baseline pours and then immediately received training; then they provided follow-up pours at two, three, and four weeks. Participants from GLO 2 (n = 2) provided baseline pours during week one and two, then immediately received training during week two. They provided follow-up pours at three and four weeks. Results show group BST was an effective strategy for teaching all participants to accurately pour standard servings of beer and that pouring skills were maintained at follow ups. However, the skill (i.e., accurate pouring) did not generalize to pouring into an untrained cup. Recommendations and limitations will be discussed.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

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Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

An Evaluation of Group Behavioral Skills Training to Teach Members of Greek Letter Organizations to Free-Pour Standard Servings of Beer

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Excessive drinking among college students is a significant problem that has serious negative consequences. Many members of Greek Letter Organizations (GLO) are more likely to report excessive drinking and increased negative consequences compared to other college students. Students who report experiencing fewer negative consequences as a result of drinking also report counting their drinks as an effective preventive strategy; however, in order to effectively use this strategy, students must be able to identify and pour accurate servings of alcohol. Previous studies have established that individually-taught behavioral skills training (BST) in a laboratory is an effective strategy to train students to accurately free-pour standard servings of beer; however, little is known about the effectiveness of BST when taught in a group format in a more naturalistic setting. We used a nonconcurrent multiple probe design across four weeks to assess the effects of group BST on the accuracy of participants’ pours taught in the GLO setting. We provided BST to participants who failed to pour within 10% of the standard serving of beer (12 oz.) during baseline assessment. Participants from GLO 1 (n = 2) provided baseline pours and then immediately received training; then they provided follow-up pours at two, three, and four weeks. Participants from GLO 2 (n = 2) provided baseline pours during week one and two, then immediately received training during week two. They provided follow-up pours at three and four weeks. Results show group BST was an effective strategy for teaching all participants to accurately pour standard servings of beer and that pouring skills were maintained at follow ups. However, the skill (i.e., accurate pouring) did not generalize to pouring into an untrained cup. Recommendations and limitations will be discussed.