Title

Don't Shy Away! Relations Among Activity Level, Gender, and Social Behaviors in Shy Toddlers

Poster Number

16B

Lead Author Major

Psychology with Honors

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jessica Grady

Faculty Mentor Email

jgrady@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Delaney Callan

Graduate Student Mentor Email

d_callan@u.pacific.edu

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

Shy children are at higher risk for social adjustment problems, such as poor peer relationships and poor social skills, as well as internalizing behavior problems such as anxiety. These social outcomes appear to vary by child gender. One possible factor that may help reduce these negative outcomes in shy children is activity level. The present study considers the relation between activity level and various social outcomes including internalizing behaviors and social competence in shy boys and girls. It is hypothesized that a higher activity level will be associated with lower internalizing behavior and that this effect is more specific to shy boys than shy girls.

Fifty-five shy 21-24-month-old toddlers engaged in various episodes, two of which included a 5-minute introduction episode and a 3-minute free play episode from the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB). Latency to begin playing, the number of toys manipulated, and vigor level during the freeplay episode were scored. Social competence and internalizing behavior were measured through parent ratings on a survey and observed behavior during the introduction episode.

Preliminary data for 20 participants showed that activity level was correlated with internalizing behaviors, r=.56, p=.01. The correlation between activity level and internalizing behaviors was similar for shy boys (n=8, r=.62) and shy girls (n=12, r=.54). There was a weak correlation between activity level and social competence, r=-.19, p=.41. This association did not differ by gender. Activity level was negatively correlated with observed boldness for boys only (r=-.62, p=.10). Based on the preliminary data analysis, higher activity level does appear to be associated with fewer internalizing behaviors for shy boys and girls, and less observed boldness for shy boys. Results with the full sample will be presented.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Don't Shy Away! Relations Among Activity Level, Gender, and Social Behaviors in Shy Toddlers

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Shy children are at higher risk for social adjustment problems, such as poor peer relationships and poor social skills, as well as internalizing behavior problems such as anxiety. These social outcomes appear to vary by child gender. One possible factor that may help reduce these negative outcomes in shy children is activity level. The present study considers the relation between activity level and various social outcomes including internalizing behaviors and social competence in shy boys and girls. It is hypothesized that a higher activity level will be associated with lower internalizing behavior and that this effect is more specific to shy boys than shy girls.

Fifty-five shy 21-24-month-old toddlers engaged in various episodes, two of which included a 5-minute introduction episode and a 3-minute free play episode from the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB). Latency to begin playing, the number of toys manipulated, and vigor level during the freeplay episode were scored. Social competence and internalizing behavior were measured through parent ratings on a survey and observed behavior during the introduction episode.

Preliminary data for 20 participants showed that activity level was correlated with internalizing behaviors, r=.56, p=.01. The correlation between activity level and internalizing behaviors was similar for shy boys (n=8, r=.62) and shy girls (n=12, r=.54). There was a weak correlation between activity level and social competence, r=-.19, p=.41. This association did not differ by gender. Activity level was negatively correlated with observed boldness for boys only (r=-.62, p=.10). Based on the preliminary data analysis, higher activity level does appear to be associated with fewer internalizing behaviors for shy boys and girls, and less observed boldness for shy boys. Results with the full sample will be presented.