Title

Probing the Evolution of Galaxy Dark Matter Since Cosmic Noon

Poster Number

06B

Lead Author Major

Physics and Applied Mathematics

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Guillermo Barro

Faculty Mentor Email

gbarro@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Physics

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Elisa Toloba

Additional Faculty Mentor Email

etoloba@pacific.edu

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Physics

Abstract/Artist Statement

The goal of this project is to study the kinematics, chemical composition, and dark matter content of distant galaxies observed at cosmic “noon”, when the Universe was only half of its current age. For this analysis we will make use of large sample of deep, +8hr galaxy spectra taken with the state-of-the-art Keck 10m telescopes as part of the HALO7D survey. The extremely high quality of these very deep spectra provide very detailed data of the stellar continua and emission lines for hundreds of galaxies which can be used to determine their stellar ages and their stellar and dark matter content. Ultimately, our goal is to compare the average properties of these galaxies at cosmic noon to those of well-known galaxies in our local environment. Such comparisons will help us understand the properties of galaxies at different points in the lifetime of the Universe, which allows us to reach conclusions regarding the evolution of the main properties of the Universe, from cosmic noon to the present.

Although the research is not yet complete, and the analysis is still a work in progress, preliminary results regarding properties of HALO7D survey targets can be made. Galaxies from the HALO7D survey have shown to be primarily star forming galaxies based on multiple plots. Signal to noise ratios of observation dates have been calculated which determines the validity of the given data sets. These preliminary findings can be expected to be displayed in the presentation, as well as possible preliminary results for the analysis of emission line spectra of star forming galaxies.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

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Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Probing the Evolution of Galaxy Dark Matter Since Cosmic Noon

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

The goal of this project is to study the kinematics, chemical composition, and dark matter content of distant galaxies observed at cosmic “noon”, when the Universe was only half of its current age. For this analysis we will make use of large sample of deep, +8hr galaxy spectra taken with the state-of-the-art Keck 10m telescopes as part of the HALO7D survey. The extremely high quality of these very deep spectra provide very detailed data of the stellar continua and emission lines for hundreds of galaxies which can be used to determine their stellar ages and their stellar and dark matter content. Ultimately, our goal is to compare the average properties of these galaxies at cosmic noon to those of well-known galaxies in our local environment. Such comparisons will help us understand the properties of galaxies at different points in the lifetime of the Universe, which allows us to reach conclusions regarding the evolution of the main properties of the Universe, from cosmic noon to the present.

Although the research is not yet complete, and the analysis is still a work in progress, preliminary results regarding properties of HALO7D survey targets can be made. Galaxies from the HALO7D survey have shown to be primarily star forming galaxies based on multiple plots. Signal to noise ratios of observation dates have been calculated which determines the validity of the given data sets. These preliminary findings can be expected to be displayed in the presentation, as well as possible preliminary results for the analysis of emission line spectra of star forming galaxies.