Title

District 108 Wetland Habitat Pump Station Project

Lead Author Major

Civil Engineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Civil Engineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Civil Engineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Fourth Author Major

Civil Engineering

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Mary Kay Camarillo

Faculty Mentor Email

mcamarillo@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Civil Engineering

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Scott Merry

Additional Faculty Mentor Email

smerry@pacific.edu

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Civil Engineering

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Luke Lee

Additional Faculty Mentor Email

llee4@pacific.edu

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Civil Engineering

Additional Mentors

Camilla Saviz

csaviz@u.pacific.edu

Civil Engineering

Hector Estrada

hestrada@pacific.edu

Civil Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

California wetlands are disappearing at an alarming rate: over 91% of California’s wetlands have been converted to farmland and urban areas. One of these wetlands is located in Reclamation District 108 in Yolo County. Our project goal is to provide an alternative water source to this wetland, which provides habitat to many important species found in the Central Valley. We have designed our project to replace the existing water demands of our project wetland, which are currently met by a pump station sourced from the Colusa Basin Drain. If the Colusa Basin Drain is in any way compromised, our pump station is designed to provide for a flow scenario based on current usage.

The proposed pump station consists of a steel housing structure, new pumps and associated valves, and two new force mains. All steel structural design was done in accordance with the California Building Code, International Building Code, and ASCE-7 standards. The steel housing structure was modeled in Revit for 3-D visualization and in RISA for structural member analysis and optimization. Geotechnical work was necessary in design of our deep foundation piles, as well as in the design of our pipeline. Geotechnical work was performed to ASTM standards when applicable. We are also incorporating trenchless drilling technology as a means of running our new pipeline under both an existing levee and the Colusa basin drain. California Code of Regulations Title 23 was used in designing the path of our pipeline, and relevant materials were selected to ASTM standards.

The proposed pump station will help maintain an existing wetland while minimizing impacts during construction. Sustainability and environmental preservation were priorities in all design decisions.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

4-5-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

4-5-2018 4:00 PM

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May 4th, 2:30 PM May 4th, 4:00 PM

District 108 Wetland Habitat Pump Station Project

School of Engineering & Computer Science

California wetlands are disappearing at an alarming rate: over 91% of California’s wetlands have been converted to farmland and urban areas. One of these wetlands is located in Reclamation District 108 in Yolo County. Our project goal is to provide an alternative water source to this wetland, which provides habitat to many important species found in the Central Valley. We have designed our project to replace the existing water demands of our project wetland, which are currently met by a pump station sourced from the Colusa Basin Drain. If the Colusa Basin Drain is in any way compromised, our pump station is designed to provide for a flow scenario based on current usage.

The proposed pump station consists of a steel housing structure, new pumps and associated valves, and two new force mains. All steel structural design was done in accordance with the California Building Code, International Building Code, and ASCE-7 standards. The steel housing structure was modeled in Revit for 3-D visualization and in RISA for structural member analysis and optimization. Geotechnical work was necessary in design of our deep foundation piles, as well as in the design of our pipeline. Geotechnical work was performed to ASTM standards when applicable. We are also incorporating trenchless drilling technology as a means of running our new pipeline under both an existing levee and the Colusa basin drain. California Code of Regulations Title 23 was used in designing the path of our pipeline, and relevant materials were selected to ASTM standards.

The proposed pump station will help maintain an existing wetland while minimizing impacts during construction. Sustainability and environmental preservation were priorities in all design decisions.