Title

Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Sequential Bone Drilling with Applications to Osteoarthritis Treatment

Poster Number

02B

Lead Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

JuEun Lee

Faculty Mentor Email

jlee12@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Mechanical Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

Current research has highlighted the thermal damages associated with surgical bone drilling. Such dangers include bone death, which can limit repair of tissues in the direct vicinity of the bored hole. This research project’s purpose was to investigate the benefits of various spindle speeds, feed rates, and drill-bit diameters to find favorable conditions that minimize temperature elevation in bone. In this experiment, bovine tibia was drilled, which has strikingly similar mechanical properties to human bone. Furthermore, these drilling tests were performed in cancellous bone, a lesser known bone tissue that is found in long bones, such as the tibia and femur. The drilling tests were performed on a computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine, and thrust force and surface temperature were simultaneously recorded as functions of time. The results of this experiment observe that smaller diameter drill bits result in lower temperature elevations on the surface of cancellous bone, and lower thrust forces overall. Moreover, lowering spindle speed also proves favorable. Lastly, faster feed rates did slightly lower force and surface temperature in this experiment. While the results provide evidence of lowering thermal damage to the bone region, additional testing on cancellous bone should be performed to improve upon current drilling techniques and to characterize the complex, undocumented behavior of this area. Few studies exist presently on cancellous bone, despite its direct vicinity to the bone surface in the knee and hip. With future studies, drilling procedures for the treatment of osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and cartilage issues may prove more effective.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

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Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Sequential Bone Drilling with Applications to Osteoarthritis Treatment

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Current research has highlighted the thermal damages associated with surgical bone drilling. Such dangers include bone death, which can limit repair of tissues in the direct vicinity of the bored hole. This research project’s purpose was to investigate the benefits of various spindle speeds, feed rates, and drill-bit diameters to find favorable conditions that minimize temperature elevation in bone. In this experiment, bovine tibia was drilled, which has strikingly similar mechanical properties to human bone. Furthermore, these drilling tests were performed in cancellous bone, a lesser known bone tissue that is found in long bones, such as the tibia and femur. The drilling tests were performed on a computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine, and thrust force and surface temperature were simultaneously recorded as functions of time. The results of this experiment observe that smaller diameter drill bits result in lower temperature elevations on the surface of cancellous bone, and lower thrust forces overall. Moreover, lowering spindle speed also proves favorable. Lastly, faster feed rates did slightly lower force and surface temperature in this experiment. While the results provide evidence of lowering thermal damage to the bone region, additional testing on cancellous bone should be performed to improve upon current drilling techniques and to characterize the complex, undocumented behavior of this area. Few studies exist presently on cancellous bone, despite its direct vicinity to the bone surface in the knee and hip. With future studies, drilling procedures for the treatment of osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and cartilage issues may prove more effective.