Title

Bloodfeeding Patterns of Culex tarsalis and Culiseta incidens in San Bernardino County

Poster Number

12B

Lead Author Major

Biological Science

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Biological Sciences

Second Author Status

Junior

Third Author Major

Biological Sciences

Third Author Status

Junior

Fourth Author Major

Biological Sciences

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Fifth Author Major

Biological Sciences

Fifth Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Tara Thiemann

Faculty Mentor Email

tthiemann@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Culex tarsalis and Culiseta incidens mosquito species are known vector species for West Nile virus (WNV) and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Analysis of mosquito blood meal samples of both Cx. tarsalis and Cs. incidens can help identify their blood feeding patterns. Mosquitoes are biological bridge vectors in spreading these diseases to other species, including humans. In 2017, there were more than 2,002 cases of WNV reported in the United States, and since the first report of WNV in 1999, there have been cases in 48 states, making it the most common disease spread by mosquitoes in America. Throughout 2010-2012, 192 mosquito samples were collected in San Bernardino County, CA by three different traps: CO2 collections, gravid traps, and resting traps. These mosquitoes were stored at -80° Celsius. The blood meal DNA from these samples were extracted and then amplified through a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which targeted the barcoding region of the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene. The PCR products were sent in for sequencing and the species fed upon were identified through the online database Barcode of Life (BOLD). Studying the feeding preferences of these mosquitoes gives insight into the pattern of transmission and the behavior influencing the feeding pattern which can help prevent the spread of WNV and SLEV to human populations. Once the mosquito samples are analyzed, trends regarding the location and habitat of the hosts can be identified, leading to a better understanding of the transmission of these diseases.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2018 12:00 PM

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Apr 27th, 10:00 AM Apr 27th, 12:00 PM

Bloodfeeding Patterns of Culex tarsalis and Culiseta incidens in San Bernardino County

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Culex tarsalis and Culiseta incidens mosquito species are known vector species for West Nile virus (WNV) and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Analysis of mosquito blood meal samples of both Cx. tarsalis and Cs. incidens can help identify their blood feeding patterns. Mosquitoes are biological bridge vectors in spreading these diseases to other species, including humans. In 2017, there were more than 2,002 cases of WNV reported in the United States, and since the first report of WNV in 1999, there have been cases in 48 states, making it the most common disease spread by mosquitoes in America. Throughout 2010-2012, 192 mosquito samples were collected in San Bernardino County, CA by three different traps: CO2 collections, gravid traps, and resting traps. These mosquitoes were stored at -80° Celsius. The blood meal DNA from these samples were extracted and then amplified through a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which targeted the barcoding region of the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene. The PCR products were sent in for sequencing and the species fed upon were identified through the online database Barcode of Life (BOLD). Studying the feeding preferences of these mosquitoes gives insight into the pattern of transmission and the behavior influencing the feeding pattern which can help prevent the spread of WNV and SLEV to human populations. Once the mosquito samples are analyzed, trends regarding the location and habitat of the hosts can be identified, leading to a better understanding of the transmission of these diseases.