Title

Aggregation behavior for emergent magnetic tops

Poster Number

03B

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Bioengineering

Second Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Joshua Steimel

Faculty Mentor Email

jsteimel@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Mechanical Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

Active matter systems are ubiquitous and include biological systems and processes like cell differentiation, wound healing, and chemotaxis. These biological systems exhibit non-equilibrium behavior as well. Active matter systems can vary in size and shape of the matter itself, mobility of the matter, and the environment. However, active matter systems are defined as being composed of active particles that continuously convert energy into motion and display emergent non- equilibrium dynamic behavior. As mentioned earlier, biological systems are active matter systems, which can be driven by biochemical or physical stimuli or even both. To understand these active matter systems, experimental systems are necessary to investigate the physical phenomena. This experimental system consists of using active micrometer ferromagnetic colloids with passive particle monolayer in a microfluidic environment. Within a 3 directional helmholtz apparatus, the active colloids spin in a top-like motion by inducing a permanent magnetic field on the z-axis, and varying spins based on actuation periods on the xy-plane. This experiment varied the top-like motion actuation periods: 1, 5, 10, 30, 60, 120, 300s. The active particles were tracked during the video and were analyzed for aggregation behavior. Analyzing this behavior with varying spin times can lead to a better understanding of the physical phenomena of active matter systems. With top spin motion, the active matter aggregated due to stress with in the monolayer then dissipated during a longer spin time. Decreasing actuation periods, this decreases the ability to stress the monolayer, thus not aggregating. This study provides the figures and graphs necessary to visualize and to interpret the data for understanding or possibly an innovative insight. Future studies would include applying tessellation and simulation models to characterize the structure.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

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Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Aggregation behavior for emergent magnetic tops

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Active matter systems are ubiquitous and include biological systems and processes like cell differentiation, wound healing, and chemotaxis. These biological systems exhibit non-equilibrium behavior as well. Active matter systems can vary in size and shape of the matter itself, mobility of the matter, and the environment. However, active matter systems are defined as being composed of active particles that continuously convert energy into motion and display emergent non- equilibrium dynamic behavior. As mentioned earlier, biological systems are active matter systems, which can be driven by biochemical or physical stimuli or even both. To understand these active matter systems, experimental systems are necessary to investigate the physical phenomena. This experimental system consists of using active micrometer ferromagnetic colloids with passive particle monolayer in a microfluidic environment. Within a 3 directional helmholtz apparatus, the active colloids spin in a top-like motion by inducing a permanent magnetic field on the z-axis, and varying spins based on actuation periods on the xy-plane. This experiment varied the top-like motion actuation periods: 1, 5, 10, 30, 60, 120, 300s. The active particles were tracked during the video and were analyzed for aggregation behavior. Analyzing this behavior with varying spin times can lead to a better understanding of the physical phenomena of active matter systems. With top spin motion, the active matter aggregated due to stress with in the monolayer then dissipated during a longer spin time. Decreasing actuation periods, this decreases the ability to stress the monolayer, thus not aggregating. This study provides the figures and graphs necessary to visualize and to interpret the data for understanding or possibly an innovative insight. Future studies would include applying tessellation and simulation models to characterize the structure.