Title

Culturally Adapted Music Repertoire for Elderly Chinese-American Immigrants

Poster Number

18B

Lead Author Major

Music Therapy

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Feilin Hsiao

Faculty Mentor Email

fhsiao@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Music Therapy

Abstract/Artist Statement

According to the American Census Bureau (2010), Chinese-American immigrants are the third largest foreign-born group in the U.S., with an estimation of over 2 million. Among them, approximately 20% are 65 years or older, and the number is expected to grow rapidly in the next decade. The use of familiar songs from young adulthood has been a common music therapy practice for this population. A few studies have investigated song repertoire used with elderly populations in music therapy practice; however, songs in Chinese are not found in these lists. When Vanweelden and Cevasco (2007) surveyed music therapists who worked with elderly populations and compiled a list of 522 songs, only 2% of the songs were in foreign languages, and none were Chinese. In addition, some categories used to generate the repertoire may not be applicable for persons from different religious, cultural, and/or political backgrounds.

The purposes of this study are to develop a song repertoire for elderly Chinese-American immigrants and to examine the factors contributing to song preference. Specifically, the following research questions are addressed: What are the song preferences of elderly Chinese-American immigrants? What are the variables affecting song preferences of elderly Chinese-American? and What is the trend for music engagement of elderly Chinese-American immigrants?

Preliminary investigation found positive relationships with mild strength between first language and language of song preferences (Cramer’s V = .38), as well as place of longest residence and language of song preferences (Cramer’s V = .32). A list of preferred songs for elderly Chinese-American immigrants was obtained. This research suggests the importance for music therapists to note preferred language, religious affiliations, and place of longest residence when selecting songs for Chinese-American immigrants. It is recommended that more research be done with a more varied participant pool to reflect the Chinese-American makeup of the U.S.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

Culturally Adapted Music Repertoire for Elderly Chinese-American Immigrants

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

According to the American Census Bureau (2010), Chinese-American immigrants are the third largest foreign-born group in the U.S., with an estimation of over 2 million. Among them, approximately 20% are 65 years or older, and the number is expected to grow rapidly in the next decade. The use of familiar songs from young adulthood has been a common music therapy practice for this population. A few studies have investigated song repertoire used with elderly populations in music therapy practice; however, songs in Chinese are not found in these lists. When Vanweelden and Cevasco (2007) surveyed music therapists who worked with elderly populations and compiled a list of 522 songs, only 2% of the songs were in foreign languages, and none were Chinese. In addition, some categories used to generate the repertoire may not be applicable for persons from different religious, cultural, and/or political backgrounds.

The purposes of this study are to develop a song repertoire for elderly Chinese-American immigrants and to examine the factors contributing to song preference. Specifically, the following research questions are addressed: What are the song preferences of elderly Chinese-American immigrants? What are the variables affecting song preferences of elderly Chinese-American? and What is the trend for music engagement of elderly Chinese-American immigrants?

Preliminary investigation found positive relationships with mild strength between first language and language of song preferences (Cramer’s V = .38), as well as place of longest residence and language of song preferences (Cramer’s V = .32). A list of preferred songs for elderly Chinese-American immigrants was obtained. This research suggests the importance for music therapists to note preferred language, religious affiliations, and place of longest residence when selecting songs for Chinese-American immigrants. It is recommended that more research be done with a more varied participant pool to reflect the Chinese-American makeup of the U.S.