Title

Turning the Paddlewheel Towards Inorganic Synthesis

Lead Author Major

Chemistry

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Qinliang Zhao

Faculty Mentor Email

qzhao@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Chemistry

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Michael Pastor

Graduate Student Mentor Email

m_pastor@u.pacific.edu

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Chemistry

Abstract/Artist Statement

Organic synthesis, widely used in pharmacies to produce common medicinal drugs, is quite relevant and of much significance to modern society. Organic chemistry deals largely with the reactivity of the functional groups: altering the functional groups on a molecule yields a new molecule. Synthesis of larger molecules for new drug design proves to be highly complex and more challenging to be achieved, however, an increasing amount of published coordination complexes have been proven to facilitate certain reactions serving as catalysts.

Generally, coordination complexes with one metal center are researched first because their convenient synthesis and control. Recently, bimetallic rhodium, iron and ruthenium complexes have demonstrated promising catalytic reactivities. However, their detailed mechanism and the role of each metal core are still not clear. To understand this, it is necessary to construct families of bimetallic complexes for systematic study.

For this research project, a family of bimetallic complexes of nickel supported by diarylformamidinate ligands have been synthesized and some have been examined by various instrumental techniques. Their synthesis involves a first step of ligand deprotonation with a strong base followed by transmetallation which replaces the main group metal with nickel. One compound that has been structurally characterized demonstrated a trigonal paddle-wheel structure. Full investigation of each compound is underway and progress will be detailed and presented.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

28-4-2018 3:40 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 4:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 3:40 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Turning the Paddlewheel Towards Inorganic Synthesis

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Organic synthesis, widely used in pharmacies to produce common medicinal drugs, is quite relevant and of much significance to modern society. Organic chemistry deals largely with the reactivity of the functional groups: altering the functional groups on a molecule yields a new molecule. Synthesis of larger molecules for new drug design proves to be highly complex and more challenging to be achieved, however, an increasing amount of published coordination complexes have been proven to facilitate certain reactions serving as catalysts.

Generally, coordination complexes with one metal center are researched first because their convenient synthesis and control. Recently, bimetallic rhodium, iron and ruthenium complexes have demonstrated promising catalytic reactivities. However, their detailed mechanism and the role of each metal core are still not clear. To understand this, it is necessary to construct families of bimetallic complexes for systematic study.

For this research project, a family of bimetallic complexes of nickel supported by diarylformamidinate ligands have been synthesized and some have been examined by various instrumental techniques. Their synthesis involves a first step of ligand deprotonation with a strong base followed by transmetallation which replaces the main group metal with nickel. One compound that has been structurally characterized demonstrated a trigonal paddle-wheel structure. Full investigation of each compound is underway and progress will be detailed and presented.