Title

The Role of Inhibitory Control in Shy Toddlers' Adjustment

Poster Number

18C

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jessica Grady

Faculty Mentor Email

jgrady@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

This study examined the relationship between inhibitory control and adjustment in shy 2-year-olds. Inhibitory control refers to the ability to inhibit a behavioral response. Participants included 48 families with 21-24-month-old toddlers (Mage = 22.9 months, SD = .70; 17 males). The study was primarily interested in testing shy children. Parents of toddlers identified using birth records were mailed a recruitment letter. Parents interested in participating were screened for child shyness using the social fear subscale of the Toddler Behavior Assessment Questionnaire (TBAQ) (Goldsmith, 1996). Children identified as shy (i.e., scored 1 SD or higher from TBAQ) participated in an hour-long study visit. Inhibitory control was measured during a snack delay task. Children’s latency to reach for the snack, anticipatory behavior, and overall inhibitory control were scored for each of four trials with varying wait times. Scores were standardized and combined into a single composite score for each trial, and then averaged across trials to form an overall inhibitory control score. Adjustment was measured using the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Adjustment Scale (ITSEA; Carter, Briggs-Gowan, Jones, & Little, 2003), from which internalizing and competence subscale scores were computed (α = .83 and .79, respectively). Children’s behaviors indicating fear (fearful facial expressions, body fear, freezing, contact seeking to parent, proximity to parent, and overall shyness) and engagement (approach, proximity to, and overall boldness) were also scored, standardized, and combined to form single scores for fear and boldness, respectively. Coders demonstrated appropriate reliability (IOA = .70 or better). Preliminary analyses indicated that inhibitory control was associated with fewer internalizing behaviors, but was unrelated to competence, fear, or engagement. Additional research is needed to further evaluate inhibitory control as a possible protective factor for shy children.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

The Role of Inhibitory Control in Shy Toddlers' Adjustment

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

This study examined the relationship between inhibitory control and adjustment in shy 2-year-olds. Inhibitory control refers to the ability to inhibit a behavioral response. Participants included 48 families with 21-24-month-old toddlers (Mage = 22.9 months, SD = .70; 17 males). The study was primarily interested in testing shy children. Parents of toddlers identified using birth records were mailed a recruitment letter. Parents interested in participating were screened for child shyness using the social fear subscale of the Toddler Behavior Assessment Questionnaire (TBAQ) (Goldsmith, 1996). Children identified as shy (i.e., scored 1 SD or higher from TBAQ) participated in an hour-long study visit. Inhibitory control was measured during a snack delay task. Children’s latency to reach for the snack, anticipatory behavior, and overall inhibitory control were scored for each of four trials with varying wait times. Scores were standardized and combined into a single composite score for each trial, and then averaged across trials to form an overall inhibitory control score. Adjustment was measured using the Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Adjustment Scale (ITSEA; Carter, Briggs-Gowan, Jones, & Little, 2003), from which internalizing and competence subscale scores were computed (α = .83 and .79, respectively). Children’s behaviors indicating fear (fearful facial expressions, body fear, freezing, contact seeking to parent, proximity to parent, and overall shyness) and engagement (approach, proximity to, and overall boldness) were also scored, standardized, and combined to form single scores for fear and boldness, respectively. Coders demonstrated appropriate reliability (IOA = .70 or better). Preliminary analyses indicated that inhibitory control was associated with fewer internalizing behaviors, but was unrelated to competence, fear, or engagement. Additional research is needed to further evaluate inhibitory control as a possible protective factor for shy children.