Title

Larval development of the túngara frog under UVB exposure (Engystomops pustulosus)

Poster Number

09B

Lead Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcos Gridi-Papp

Faculty Mentor Email

mgridipapp@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Many vertebrates need UVB light to synthesize vitamin D3 and metabolize calcium for proper development. Excess UVB, however, can damage the DNA and be deleterious to the animal. In order to test the effects of UVB light on a tropical frog, we produced 3 different experiments that measured overall growth and leg development in tadpoles that exhibit deficient leg development without vitamin supplementation. Each experiment had 5 tanks, each filled with water and housing seven mesh baskets each containing 10 tadpoles. Each tank provided a different treatment in each experiment. Experiment 1: UVB light at varying distances, experiment 2: various exposure times of UVB light, and experiment 3: various types of light bulbs (UVB, UVA, incandescent, and fluorescent). The results showed that snout to tail length (STL) was highly correlated with snout to vent length (SVL) in tadpoles across experiments and treatments. This relationship was weaker in the juveniles because tail reabsorption is quick and our daily monitoring caught individuals at various stages of the process. In the juveniles, the angle of the knee across all experiments was significantly higher in tanks with UVB treatment, indicating that UVB light can negatively influence the development of frog larvae. Overall, the tadpoles and juveniles throughout all 3 experiments did not grow more with UVB, and at times grew less than the control tanks. The nutritional deficiencies that impact growth does not relate to a lack of vitamin D3 as they receive enough from their food. This does indicate, however, that UVB cannot be used by tadpoles during the growth phase to synthesize vitamin D3 and reach normal development. A sensitivity window at earlier developmental stages is still possible and should be tested.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

Larval development of the túngara frog under UVB exposure (Engystomops pustulosus)

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Many vertebrates need UVB light to synthesize vitamin D3 and metabolize calcium for proper development. Excess UVB, however, can damage the DNA and be deleterious to the animal. In order to test the effects of UVB light on a tropical frog, we produced 3 different experiments that measured overall growth and leg development in tadpoles that exhibit deficient leg development without vitamin supplementation. Each experiment had 5 tanks, each filled with water and housing seven mesh baskets each containing 10 tadpoles. Each tank provided a different treatment in each experiment. Experiment 1: UVB light at varying distances, experiment 2: various exposure times of UVB light, and experiment 3: various types of light bulbs (UVB, UVA, incandescent, and fluorescent). The results showed that snout to tail length (STL) was highly correlated with snout to vent length (SVL) in tadpoles across experiments and treatments. This relationship was weaker in the juveniles because tail reabsorption is quick and our daily monitoring caught individuals at various stages of the process. In the juveniles, the angle of the knee across all experiments was significantly higher in tanks with UVB treatment, indicating that UVB light can negatively influence the development of frog larvae. Overall, the tadpoles and juveniles throughout all 3 experiments did not grow more with UVB, and at times grew less than the control tanks. The nutritional deficiencies that impact growth does not relate to a lack of vitamin D3 as they receive enough from their food. This does indicate, however, that UVB cannot be used by tadpoles during the growth phase to synthesize vitamin D3 and reach normal development. A sensitivity window at earlier developmental stages is still possible and should be tested.