Title

Acoustical species recognition triggers oviposition in the túngara frog (Engystomops pustulosus)

Poster Number

06B

Lead Author Major

Biochemistry

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Second Author Major

Biological Sciences

Second Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcos Gridi-Papp

Faculty Mentor Email

mgridipapp@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Recent studies in our lab revealed that acoustic stimulation of túngara frog females with the conspecific male mating call induces oviposition in the presence of water. Here we test if species recognition is necessary for the induction of oviposition. The part of the call called the whine, which starts at 1000 Hz and sweeps down to 400 Hz, is used for species recognition. Females are known not to recognize the call, however, if the whine is reversed, sweeping up from low to high frequency. To identify how selective female túngara frogs are in their oviposition response, we tested a colony of captive túngara frogs in a series of experiments. Cycling through the colony, twelve females at a time were individually placed in acrylic containers with reconstituted, deionized water. They were then placed in ventilated, sound-proof boxes and exposed to one of three stimuli: 1) Silence 2) Normal male mating call 3) Reversed male mating call. We tested a total of 233 females. Females that did not drop eggs in the experiment were subsequently placed with a male to determine if they were reproductively ready by laying eggs. We did not analyze females that were not reproductively ready (49%). Fourteen of 46 (30.4%) females dropped eggs when exposed to the normal whine stimulus treatment. In comparison, only 3 of 44 (6.8%) females dropped eggs when listening to the reversed whine. A chi-square test showed a significant difference between the results of the two call stimuli (p = 0.004). During the silent experiments, 0 of 29 females dropped eggs. The results of this experiment show that auditory species recognition promotes oviposition even in the absence of the male túngara frog. This suggests that the neurological process of species recognition controls an endocrine response regulating the female reproductive system.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

Acoustical species recognition triggers oviposition in the túngara frog (Engystomops pustulosus)

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Recent studies in our lab revealed that acoustic stimulation of túngara frog females with the conspecific male mating call induces oviposition in the presence of water. Here we test if species recognition is necessary for the induction of oviposition. The part of the call called the whine, which starts at 1000 Hz and sweeps down to 400 Hz, is used for species recognition. Females are known not to recognize the call, however, if the whine is reversed, sweeping up from low to high frequency. To identify how selective female túngara frogs are in their oviposition response, we tested a colony of captive túngara frogs in a series of experiments. Cycling through the colony, twelve females at a time were individually placed in acrylic containers with reconstituted, deionized water. They were then placed in ventilated, sound-proof boxes and exposed to one of three stimuli: 1) Silence 2) Normal male mating call 3) Reversed male mating call. We tested a total of 233 females. Females that did not drop eggs in the experiment were subsequently placed with a male to determine if they were reproductively ready by laying eggs. We did not analyze females that were not reproductively ready (49%). Fourteen of 46 (30.4%) females dropped eggs when exposed to the normal whine stimulus treatment. In comparison, only 3 of 44 (6.8%) females dropped eggs when listening to the reversed whine. A chi-square test showed a significant difference between the results of the two call stimuli (p = 0.004). During the silent experiments, 0 of 29 females dropped eggs. The results of this experiment show that auditory species recognition promotes oviposition even in the absence of the male túngara frog. This suggests that the neurological process of species recognition controls an endocrine response regulating the female reproductive system.