Title

What have you done for me lately? The relationship between employee satisfaction with training, financial incentives, engagement, and intent to leave

Poster Number

16B

Lead Author Major

Business Administration with a concentration in Human Resources & Management and Marketing

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Chris J. Sablynski

Faculty Mentor Email

csablynski@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Eberhardt School of Business

Abstract/Artist Statement

In 2017, nearly 80% of organizational leaders rated employee experience as being important to the success of their organizations (Bersin, Flynn, Mazor, and Melian, 2017). However, only 22% reported their companies as being excellent at building a differentiated employee experience. In the academic literature, one of the most common methods of assessing employee experience is via measuring employee engagement. Several studies have examined predictors of employee engagement. However, to date, no published studies have explored employee satisfaction with the training and development they receive as a predictor of engagement. In addition, previous studies have not explored the relationship between satisfaction with training and financial incentives (e.g., pay, benefits) relative to engagement. Beyond engagement, organizations also seek to keep or retain their best employees. Little information is available regarding the level of employee satisfaction with training they have received as it relates to their desire to leave their jobs.

Thus, the purpose of the present study is to examine the impact of employee satisfaction with training received, satisfaction with incentives provided by their employer, overall engagement, and their intent to leave (e.g., quit) their jobs.

At present, only pilot study information is available for analysis. An on-line survey was used to collect data from a sample of full-time workers in the United States. It was hypothesized that satisfaction with training will be correlated with employee engagement and this hypothesis was supported (r = .66, p < .05). In addition, it was hypothesized that satisfaction with incentives will be correlated with employee engagement and this hypothesis was supported as well (r = .72, p < .01). The final two hypotheses were also supported. That is, intent to leave was strongly negatively correlated with satisfaction with training (r = -.71, p <.05) and with satisfaction with financial incentives (r = -.69, p < .05). When a larger sample becomes available, we will also use multiple regression to test to see if satisfaction with training is a stronger predictor of employee engagement than financial incentives.

Given the preliminary sample of data is small, caution must be used when interpreting the findings. If these patterns emerge with a larger sample of data (this study is currently underway), we may be able to provide theoretical and practical advances regarding predictors of employee engagement – particularly that of employee satisfaction with the training and development they receive. Overall, the results of this study may help scholars and organizational decision makers better understand the subtleties of retaining employees.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

What have you done for me lately? The relationship between employee satisfaction with training, financial incentives, engagement, and intent to leave

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

In 2017, nearly 80% of organizational leaders rated employee experience as being important to the success of their organizations (Bersin, Flynn, Mazor, and Melian, 2017). However, only 22% reported their companies as being excellent at building a differentiated employee experience. In the academic literature, one of the most common methods of assessing employee experience is via measuring employee engagement. Several studies have examined predictors of employee engagement. However, to date, no published studies have explored employee satisfaction with the training and development they receive as a predictor of engagement. In addition, previous studies have not explored the relationship between satisfaction with training and financial incentives (e.g., pay, benefits) relative to engagement. Beyond engagement, organizations also seek to keep or retain their best employees. Little information is available regarding the level of employee satisfaction with training they have received as it relates to their desire to leave their jobs.

Thus, the purpose of the present study is to examine the impact of employee satisfaction with training received, satisfaction with incentives provided by their employer, overall engagement, and their intent to leave (e.g., quit) their jobs.

At present, only pilot study information is available for analysis. An on-line survey was used to collect data from a sample of full-time workers in the United States. It was hypothesized that satisfaction with training will be correlated with employee engagement and this hypothesis was supported (r = .66, p < .05). In addition, it was hypothesized that satisfaction with incentives will be correlated with employee engagement and this hypothesis was supported as well (r = .72, p < .01). The final two hypotheses were also supported. That is, intent to leave was strongly negatively correlated with satisfaction with training (r = -.71, p <.05) and with satisfaction with financial incentives (r = -.69, p < .05). When a larger sample becomes available, we will also use multiple regression to test to see if satisfaction with training is a stronger predictor of employee engagement than financial incentives.

Given the preliminary sample of data is small, caution must be used when interpreting the findings. If these patterns emerge with a larger sample of data (this study is currently underway), we may be able to provide theoretical and practical advances regarding predictors of employee engagement – particularly that of employee satisfaction with the training and development they receive. Overall, the results of this study may help scholars and organizational decision makers better understand the subtleties of retaining employees.