Title

An evaluation of the efficacy of and preference for predictable versus unpredictable conditions of reinforcement and demands.

Poster Number

19C

Lead Author Major

Psychology and Political Science

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Mahshid Ghaemmaghami

Faculty Mentor Email

mghaemmaghami@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Matthew Boliard

Graduate Student Mentor Email

m_boliard@u.pacific.edu

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

It is often unknown as to how parents and teachers are able to motivate children to work efficiently. In this study we aimed to learn whether children prefer to know how much work they were required to do and what reward (i.e., reinforcer) they would receive, as well as their relative performance during different conditions. We used a Concurrent Chains Arrangement (CCA) to compare an individual’s relative preference for predictable (i.e., knowing the amount of work and the reinforcer) versus unpredictable (i.e., not knowing the amount of work and the reinforcer) and a no reinforcement condition (i.e., control). CCA is an experimental method of identifying an individual’s relative preference by allowing the individual to freely choose the context they wish to experience (Hanley, 2010). Preference is determined by repeated selection towards one condition. A 9-year-old typically developing boy participated in this study. With the first task (math problems), the participant alternated between choosing the control and predictable conditions suggesting that the completion of the task itself may have been reinforcing enough and that the delivery of additional reinforcers was unnecessary. With the second task (writing demands), the participant alternated between the predictable and unpredictable conditions suggesting a preference for a reinforcement condition but no preference for the manner in which these reinforcers are delivered. Additionally, the participant performed at similar rates across these conditions. This procedure will be replicated with more participants to assess for trends in the wider population.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

An evaluation of the efficacy of and preference for predictable versus unpredictable conditions of reinforcement and demands.

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

It is often unknown as to how parents and teachers are able to motivate children to work efficiently. In this study we aimed to learn whether children prefer to know how much work they were required to do and what reward (i.e., reinforcer) they would receive, as well as their relative performance during different conditions. We used a Concurrent Chains Arrangement (CCA) to compare an individual’s relative preference for predictable (i.e., knowing the amount of work and the reinforcer) versus unpredictable (i.e., not knowing the amount of work and the reinforcer) and a no reinforcement condition (i.e., control). CCA is an experimental method of identifying an individual’s relative preference by allowing the individual to freely choose the context they wish to experience (Hanley, 2010). Preference is determined by repeated selection towards one condition. A 9-year-old typically developing boy participated in this study. With the first task (math problems), the participant alternated between choosing the control and predictable conditions suggesting that the completion of the task itself may have been reinforcing enough and that the delivery of additional reinforcers was unnecessary. With the second task (writing demands), the participant alternated between the predictable and unpredictable conditions suggesting a preference for a reinforcement condition but no preference for the manner in which these reinforcers are delivered. Additionally, the participant performed at similar rates across these conditions. This procedure will be replicated with more participants to assess for trends in the wider population.