Title

Dynamical Constraints on Nontransiting Planets Orbiting Trappist-1

Poster Number

13B

Lead Author Major

Biochemistry

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Daniel Jontof-Hutter

Faculty Mentor Email

djontofhutter@gmail.com

Faculty Mentor Department

Physics

Abstract/Artist Statement

Trappist-1 is a star about 40 light years from Earth with seven transiting rocky exoplanets, all orbiting in the same plane. The outermost known planet orbits Trappist-1 7 times closer to its host star than Mercury orbits the Sun. Through this study, we determined constraints on the orbital distances and inclinations of undetected exoplanets orbiting TRAPPIST-1, beyond the seven known planets. An additional planet on a moderately inclined orbit would induce mutual inclinations in the known planets. Such a planet can be ruled unlikely to exist if the induced inclinations among the known planets make their co-transiting geometry unlikely. A Jovian mass planet inclined by ≥ 3 degrees can be ruled out within 0.53 AU. Our constraints exceed those possible with other observational methods.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

Dynamical Constraints on Nontransiting Planets Orbiting Trappist-1

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Trappist-1 is a star about 40 light years from Earth with seven transiting rocky exoplanets, all orbiting in the same plane. The outermost known planet orbits Trappist-1 7 times closer to its host star than Mercury orbits the Sun. Through this study, we determined constraints on the orbital distances and inclinations of undetected exoplanets orbiting TRAPPIST-1, beyond the seven known planets. An additional planet on a moderately inclined orbit would induce mutual inclinations in the known planets. Such a planet can be ruled unlikely to exist if the induced inclinations among the known planets make their co-transiting geometry unlikely. A Jovian mass planet inclined by ≥ 3 degrees can be ruled out within 0.53 AU. Our constraints exceed those possible with other observational methods.