Title

Sculpin Out a Fishy Situation: Bioinformatic Analysis of Fish in the McCloud River, California

Poster Number

08B

Lead Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Second Author Major

Biological Sciences

Second Author Status

Sophomore

Third Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jason Baumsteiger

Faculty Mentor Email

jbaumsteiger@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Erin Thompson

Graduate Student Mentor Email

erinmichaelthompson@gmail.com

Abstract/Artist Statement

The McCloud River contains a unique subspecies of Rainbow Trout that are under protection. It is possible other endemic fish, such as sculpin, may also be unique, making a watershed-level approach of protection appropriate. Three known species of sculpin reside in California rivers: Prickly, Riffle, and Pit Sculpin. For this study, sculpin from 7 different rivers, including different areas in the McCloud River, were collected. The genomes of each individual were sequenced, compared, and organized bioinformatically. An admixture analysis was then run using the resulting genomic data, developing admixture figures. The first analysis gave a K of 2, indicating two clusters. These results show that sculpin collected from the mouth of the McCloud River clustered with known Prickly Sculpin, a completely different species from sculpin further upstream in the McCloud. All Prickly Sculpin were removed from the data before rerunning the remaining dataset. This resulted in a new admixture figure with K’s of 3 and 4.This figure indicated sculpin from the McCloud River were distinct from known Riffle and Pit Sculpin. A K of 3 implied that McCloud sculpin were closely connected to Hot Springs Creek sculpin, as both were clustered together. However, a K of 4 separated fish from the two aforementioned locations into two distinct groups. Whether the McCloud sculpin is its own species or a subspecies of a potentially new species that includes Hot Springs Creek, is undetermined, but they are indubitably distinct from known Pit and Riffle Sculpin. This places sculpin from the McCloud River as possible candidates for government protection or further investigation for morphological differences between potential species. Along with the subspecies of Rainbow Trout, the newly defined sculpin suggests additional distinct fauna native to the McCloud River are likely. Thus, an emphasis should be placed on conserving the whole McCloud River ecosystem.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Sculpin Out a Fishy Situation: Bioinformatic Analysis of Fish in the McCloud River, California

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

The McCloud River contains a unique subspecies of Rainbow Trout that are under protection. It is possible other endemic fish, such as sculpin, may also be unique, making a watershed-level approach of protection appropriate. Three known species of sculpin reside in California rivers: Prickly, Riffle, and Pit Sculpin. For this study, sculpin from 7 different rivers, including different areas in the McCloud River, were collected. The genomes of each individual were sequenced, compared, and organized bioinformatically. An admixture analysis was then run using the resulting genomic data, developing admixture figures. The first analysis gave a K of 2, indicating two clusters. These results show that sculpin collected from the mouth of the McCloud River clustered with known Prickly Sculpin, a completely different species from sculpin further upstream in the McCloud. All Prickly Sculpin were removed from the data before rerunning the remaining dataset. This resulted in a new admixture figure with K’s of 3 and 4.This figure indicated sculpin from the McCloud River were distinct from known Riffle and Pit Sculpin. A K of 3 implied that McCloud sculpin were closely connected to Hot Springs Creek sculpin, as both were clustered together. However, a K of 4 separated fish from the two aforementioned locations into two distinct groups. Whether the McCloud sculpin is its own species or a subspecies of a potentially new species that includes Hot Springs Creek, is undetermined, but they are indubitably distinct from known Pit and Riffle Sculpin. This places sculpin from the McCloud River as possible candidates for government protection or further investigation for morphological differences between potential species. Along with the subspecies of Rainbow Trout, the newly defined sculpin suggests additional distinct fauna native to the McCloud River are likely. Thus, an emphasis should be placed on conserving the whole McCloud River ecosystem.