Title

The effect of vitamins associated with bone development on túngara frog larvae

Poster Number

08C

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcos Gridi-Papp

Faculty Mentor Email

mgridipapp@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

The physiological requirements of diet and water quality in tropical frogs are still not completely understood, especially regarding nutrition during the larval stage. A diet of tropical fish flakes is insufficient for proper development of túngara frog larvae, so adding a vitamin supplement developed for reptiles (contains over 40 different components) to the water every other day significantly increased their survival and proper metamorphosis. Our goal is to identify the most critical components of the dietary supplement. We began by testing three components associated with bone development: vitamins K2, D3 and B12. There were five treatments: (1) control, (2) vitamin complex added every other day, (3) vitamin D3-K2 added every day, (4) vitamin D3 added every day, (5) vitamin B12 added every day. Each treatment contained 7 baskets of 10 tadpoles, each basket representing a different brood. The growth of the tadpoles was recorded until each tadpole metamorphosed, and final measurements were taken at the juvenile stage. There was no significant difference between the treatments during tadpole growth (SVL p=0.373, STL p=0.424), nor for juvenile knee angle measurements, a measure of proper metamorphosis (p=0.103). The lack of significance indicates that the improved development observed with the vitamin supplement was not due to the individual effects of vitamins K2, D3 and B12; however, the results may be inaccurate because treatment two did not perform significantly better than the control. Supplementing these calcium metabolism vitamins may not be necessary for healthy larval development or there may be a short window of sensitivity during early development for nutrient uptake. This study provided directions for future experiments to improve the husbandry of captive túngara frogs and advance understanding of the growth physiology of tropical amphibians.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

The effect of vitamins associated with bone development on túngara frog larvae

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

The physiological requirements of diet and water quality in tropical frogs are still not completely understood, especially regarding nutrition during the larval stage. A diet of tropical fish flakes is insufficient for proper development of túngara frog larvae, so adding a vitamin supplement developed for reptiles (contains over 40 different components) to the water every other day significantly increased their survival and proper metamorphosis. Our goal is to identify the most critical components of the dietary supplement. We began by testing three components associated with bone development: vitamins K2, D3 and B12. There were five treatments: (1) control, (2) vitamin complex added every other day, (3) vitamin D3-K2 added every day, (4) vitamin D3 added every day, (5) vitamin B12 added every day. Each treatment contained 7 baskets of 10 tadpoles, each basket representing a different brood. The growth of the tadpoles was recorded until each tadpole metamorphosed, and final measurements were taken at the juvenile stage. There was no significant difference between the treatments during tadpole growth (SVL p=0.373, STL p=0.424), nor for juvenile knee angle measurements, a measure of proper metamorphosis (p=0.103). The lack of significance indicates that the improved development observed with the vitamin supplement was not due to the individual effects of vitamins K2, D3 and B12; however, the results may be inaccurate because treatment two did not perform significantly better than the control. Supplementing these calcium metabolism vitamins may not be necessary for healthy larval development or there may be a short window of sensitivity during early development for nutrient uptake. This study provided directions for future experiments to improve the husbandry of captive túngara frogs and advance understanding of the growth physiology of tropical amphibians.