Title

Optimization of Chicken Microsatellite Markers

Poster Number

14B

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Biological Sciences

Second Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Tara Thiemann

Faculty Mentor Email

tthiemann@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Red junglefowl (Gallus gallus) a chicken belonging to the family Phasianidae, is the ancestor of the domesticated chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). Domesticated chickens are often used by vector control agencies as sentinels for West Nile and other mosquito-borne viruses. To determine how much virus is circulating in an area, chickens are tested for virus antibodies every other week. Current calculations of virus prevalence assume that sentinel chickens are fed upon equally by mosquitoes. The goal of the current research was to test that assumption by utilizing genetic markers, specifically microsatellites, to determine the proportion of mosquitoes feeding on each chicken in a sentinel coop. At a study site in Lake County, California, blood-fed wild mosquitoes were collected from a sentinel chicken coop housing six (6) chickens. Before mosquito feeding patterns could be assessed, microsatellite markers were optimized to distinguish these individual chickens. Chicken blood samples were tested via a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to provide melt curves of the microsatellite markers. Microsatellite patterns, based on melt temperatures, were used to create DNA fingerprints to distinguish the individuals. Further research, once microsatellites markers are optimized, will investigate whether mosquitoes exhibit host preference or if mosquitoes feed randomly in these sentinel chicken coops.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Optimization of Chicken Microsatellite Markers

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Red junglefowl (Gallus gallus) a chicken belonging to the family Phasianidae, is the ancestor of the domesticated chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). Domesticated chickens are often used by vector control agencies as sentinels for West Nile and other mosquito-borne viruses. To determine how much virus is circulating in an area, chickens are tested for virus antibodies every other week. Current calculations of virus prevalence assume that sentinel chickens are fed upon equally by mosquitoes. The goal of the current research was to test that assumption by utilizing genetic markers, specifically microsatellites, to determine the proportion of mosquitoes feeding on each chicken in a sentinel coop. At a study site in Lake County, California, blood-fed wild mosquitoes were collected from a sentinel chicken coop housing six (6) chickens. Before mosquito feeding patterns could be assessed, microsatellite markers were optimized to distinguish these individual chickens. Chicken blood samples were tested via a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to provide melt curves of the microsatellite markers. Microsatellite patterns, based on melt temperatures, were used to create DNA fingerprints to distinguish the individuals. Further research, once microsatellites markers are optimized, will investigate whether mosquitoes exhibit host preference or if mosquitoes feed randomly in these sentinel chicken coops.