Title

Nutritional requirements during larval development in the Túngara Frog

Poster Number

08B

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Biological Sciences

Second Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcos Gridi-Papp

Faculty Mentor Email

mgridipapp@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Tadpoles can develop in many freshwater environments and they have to cope with the conditions of the water body in which their parents decided to spawn. The optimal diet for tadpole development has not yet been identified for all groups. This will demand a better understanding of the physiology of tadpoles in general and the specific needs of the major groups inhabiting temperate as well as tropical environments. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of diet complementation with a vitamin supplement on tadpole growth. Tadpoles taken from five broods were split into 5 baskets per brood and distributed into five tanks. Every tank had five baskets with 10 representatives of each brood per basket. Each tank received the supplement dissolved in water with a different schedule: no supplement (control), daily, every other day, every fourth day, and every eighth day. Each dose consisted of 0.25 g of vitamin supplement powder containing 14 minerals, 17 amino acids, and 14 other nutrients. The water was deionized and reconstituted to 350 osm with the most common ions found in surface waters. The tadpoles were fed daily, and any leftover particles were siphoned out. Nitrate levels, pH, temperature, and water hardness were monitored to evaluate the water quality, and the water was replaced whenever the quality was insufficient. The tadpoles were photographed every third day for biometry. After metamorphosis, the tadpoles were preserved and photographed. The images were measured in imageJ. Our preliminary data analysis indicates that the best and worst performances were those of the alternate days and control groups, respectively. This experiment will reveal the importance and amount of nutrient supplementation needed for normal development in this tropical amphibian.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

Nutritional requirements during larval development in the Túngara Frog

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Tadpoles can develop in many freshwater environments and they have to cope with the conditions of the water body in which their parents decided to spawn. The optimal diet for tadpole development has not yet been identified for all groups. This will demand a better understanding of the physiology of tadpoles in general and the specific needs of the major groups inhabiting temperate as well as tropical environments. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of diet complementation with a vitamin supplement on tadpole growth. Tadpoles taken from five broods were split into 5 baskets per brood and distributed into five tanks. Every tank had five baskets with 10 representatives of each brood per basket. Each tank received the supplement dissolved in water with a different schedule: no supplement (control), daily, every other day, every fourth day, and every eighth day. Each dose consisted of 0.25 g of vitamin supplement powder containing 14 minerals, 17 amino acids, and 14 other nutrients. The water was deionized and reconstituted to 350 osm with the most common ions found in surface waters. The tadpoles were fed daily, and any leftover particles were siphoned out. Nitrate levels, pH, temperature, and water hardness were monitored to evaluate the water quality, and the water was replaced whenever the quality was insufficient. The tadpoles were photographed every third day for biometry. After metamorphosis, the tadpoles were preserved and photographed. The images were measured in imageJ. Our preliminary data analysis indicates that the best and worst performances were those of the alternate days and control groups, respectively. This experiment will reveal the importance and amount of nutrient supplementation needed for normal development in this tropical amphibian.