Title

Spider Dragline Silk Contains Water Soluble Proteins

Poster Number

02B

Lead Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Biological Sciences

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Third Author Status

Sophomore

Fourth Author Major

Biological Sciences

Fourth Author Status

Sophomore

Fifth Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Fifth Author Status

Sophomore

Sixth Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Sixth Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Craig Vierra

Faculty Mentor Email

c_vierra@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Modern society recognizes that spider silk has a greater toughness than Kevlar, which has induced many labs around the world to research the components, mechanical properties, and artificial reproduction of spider silk. The two major silk proteins found in dragline silk are MaSp1 and MaSp2 (Major Ampullate Spidroin 1&2), which are very large, insoluble proteins that compose a majority of the spider silk. Most labs have been partially successful at artificially recreating spider silk by using only MaSp1 and MaSp2. In our experiment with Lactrodectus hesperus (Black Widow Spiders), we wanted to determine whether there are water soluble proteins on the surface of the natural spider silk, which other labs have not explored. In our studies, native silk was collected, washed with water, and the resulting water fraction was digested with both trypsin and glu-C. Finally, the protease digest was analyzed by nano-LC MS/MS and the following water soluble proteins were discovered: AcSp1, Aqueous glue droplet peptide, Putative uncharacterized protein, and SST 241 uncharacterized protein. The identification of AcSp1 in the water fraction might suggest that it could be used for artificial fiber production by wet spinning methodologies that are based on water solvents.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Spider Dragline Silk Contains Water Soluble Proteins

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Modern society recognizes that spider silk has a greater toughness than Kevlar, which has induced many labs around the world to research the components, mechanical properties, and artificial reproduction of spider silk. The two major silk proteins found in dragline silk are MaSp1 and MaSp2 (Major Ampullate Spidroin 1&2), which are very large, insoluble proteins that compose a majority of the spider silk. Most labs have been partially successful at artificially recreating spider silk by using only MaSp1 and MaSp2. In our experiment with Lactrodectus hesperus (Black Widow Spiders), we wanted to determine whether there are water soluble proteins on the surface of the natural spider silk, which other labs have not explored. In our studies, native silk was collected, washed with water, and the resulting water fraction was digested with both trypsin and glu-C. Finally, the protease digest was analyzed by nano-LC MS/MS and the following water soluble proteins were discovered: AcSp1, Aqueous glue droplet peptide, Putative uncharacterized protein, and SST 241 uncharacterized protein. The identification of AcSp1 in the water fraction might suggest that it could be used for artificial fiber production by wet spinning methodologies that are based on water solvents.