Title

Microdissection of Black Widow Spider Silk-Producing Glands and Proteomic Analysis

Poster Number

01B

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Biological Sciences

Second Author Status

Junior

Third Author Major

Biological Sciences

Third Author Status

Senior

Fourth Author Major

Biological Sciences

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Craig Vierra

Faculty Mentor Email

cvierra@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Spider silk is known to be one of Earth’s strongest biological materials. Spider silk also has great potential usage, such as medicinal properties in wound healing, as well as industrial applications due to its high tensile strength, elasticity, toughness. It also presents an eco-friendly alternative since it is biodegradable. With these qualities, spider silk has infinite potential to eventually replace traditional synthetics such as nylon and Kevlar. This study focused on the microdissection of the female Black Widow spider (L. hesperus), and the isolation of different silk producing glands. Isolated silk-producing glands were used for proteomic analysis to identify new proteins involved in the silk assembly and extrusion pathway. Isolated silk-producing glands were lysed, digested with proteolytic enzymes and the peptides analyzed by mass spectrometry. Our studies reveal the presence of new factors that might participate in silk fiber formation. Identification of these proteins by proteomics will potentially help lead to the production of higher performance artificial silk fibers.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Microdissection of Black Widow Spider Silk-Producing Glands and Proteomic Analysis

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Spider silk is known to be one of Earth’s strongest biological materials. Spider silk also has great potential usage, such as medicinal properties in wound healing, as well as industrial applications due to its high tensile strength, elasticity, toughness. It also presents an eco-friendly alternative since it is biodegradable. With these qualities, spider silk has infinite potential to eventually replace traditional synthetics such as nylon and Kevlar. This study focused on the microdissection of the female Black Widow spider (L. hesperus), and the isolation of different silk producing glands. Isolated silk-producing glands were used for proteomic analysis to identify new proteins involved in the silk assembly and extrusion pathway. Isolated silk-producing glands were lysed, digested with proteolytic enzymes and the peptides analyzed by mass spectrometry. Our studies reveal the presence of new factors that might participate in silk fiber formation. Identification of these proteins by proteomics will potentially help lead to the production of higher performance artificial silk fibers.