Title

Mosquito Collection Device Utilizing Positive Phonotaxis and Positive Chemotaxis

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Bioengineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Bioengineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Huihui Xu

Faculty Mentor Email

hxu@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Bioengineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

In 2017, 536 people in California were infected with West Nile Virus (WNV). California Vector Control Districts are tasked with monitoring the prevalence of mosquitoes to combat the spread of vector-borne diseases, such as WNV. Mosquitoes are often collected by baiting traps. Common baits, such as carbon dioxide and light, attract most California mosquito species. Some mosquitoes, however, utilize sound to find hosts, and are not drawn to traps with standard baiting mechanisms. To solve this problem, our proposed mosquito collection device collects mosquitoes using chemical odorants with the addition of sound. The device utilizes two distinct subsystems: bating and collection. Baiting is accomplished by a Raspberry Pi system designed to run a sound recording from a USB to a speaker for sound amplification, powered by a rechargeable battery pack. Additionally, there is a chemical chamber designed to hold dry ice to create CO2, a chemical odorant, to cascade over the unit. Collection of mosquitoes is accomplished by a fan-motor assembly, powered with batteries, which creates suction into a mesh collection bag. Our client, Lake County Mosquito and Vector Control, is not currently able to passively collect three mosquito species, two of which have been historically detected with WNV. It is known that these species of interest show a feeding preference for a specific amphibian species found in Lake County. A device baited with sounds specific to these amphibians will allow better baiting and collection of the mosquitoes in question, while still capturing other species using chemical odorants. This will improve monitoring of both mosquito and disease prevalence.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

5-5-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

5-5-2018 4:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 5th, 3:30 PM May 5th, 4:30 PM

Mosquito Collection Device Utilizing Positive Phonotaxis and Positive Chemotaxis

School of Engineering & Computer Science

In 2017, 536 people in California were infected with West Nile Virus (WNV). California Vector Control Districts are tasked with monitoring the prevalence of mosquitoes to combat the spread of vector-borne diseases, such as WNV. Mosquitoes are often collected by baiting traps. Common baits, such as carbon dioxide and light, attract most California mosquito species. Some mosquitoes, however, utilize sound to find hosts, and are not drawn to traps with standard baiting mechanisms. To solve this problem, our proposed mosquito collection device collects mosquitoes using chemical odorants with the addition of sound. The device utilizes two distinct subsystems: bating and collection. Baiting is accomplished by a Raspberry Pi system designed to run a sound recording from a USB to a speaker for sound amplification, powered by a rechargeable battery pack. Additionally, there is a chemical chamber designed to hold dry ice to create CO2, a chemical odorant, to cascade over the unit. Collection of mosquitoes is accomplished by a fan-motor assembly, powered with batteries, which creates suction into a mesh collection bag. Our client, Lake County Mosquito and Vector Control, is not currently able to passively collect three mosquito species, two of which have been historically detected with WNV. It is known that these species of interest show a feeding preference for a specific amphibian species found in Lake County. A device baited with sounds specific to these amphibians will allow better baiting and collection of the mosquitoes in question, while still capturing other species using chemical odorants. This will improve monitoring of both mosquito and disease prevalence.