Title

Feeling Stuck on the Job? The Big Five Personality Dimensions and Job Embeddedness

Poster Number

16C

Lead Author Major

Business Administration

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Chris J. Sablynski

Faculty Mentor Email

csablynski@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Eberhardt School of Business

Abstract/Artist Statement

In previous research, job embeddedness has been connected to the notion of feeling “stuck” in a job. However, the concept of feeling “stuck” has yet to be explored in relation to individual level differences such as personality.

This study explores the idea of feeling “stuck” in a job relative to the dimensions of the Big Five personality framework (e.g., agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, extraversion, and openness to experience). A total of 294 adults working full-time were surveyed on a number of questions regarding job embeddedness. Specifically, written responses to the question, “Overall, what words would you use to describe yourself as an employee?” were coded and categorized into the five dimensions.

I hypothesized that employees who were classified as conscientious, would be more likely to not feel “stuck” in their job. In a post hoc analysis, it was discovered that in fact it was employees categorized as open to experience, who were likely to not feel “stuck” in their job.

Each of the five characteristics were examined using a two-sample z test for proportions. Through these tests, we found that there is sufficient evidence at the 0.05 level to suggest that, of those that are open to experience, the proportion that do not feel “stuck” is greater than the proportion that do feel “stuck.” No such relationship emerged with respect to the Big Five characteristic of conscientiousness. Managerial implications and areas for future research are discussed.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:00 PM

Feeling Stuck on the Job? The Big Five Personality Dimensions and Job Embeddedness

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

In previous research, job embeddedness has been connected to the notion of feeling “stuck” in a job. However, the concept of feeling “stuck” has yet to be explored in relation to individual level differences such as personality.

This study explores the idea of feeling “stuck” in a job relative to the dimensions of the Big Five personality framework (e.g., agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, extraversion, and openness to experience). A total of 294 adults working full-time were surveyed on a number of questions regarding job embeddedness. Specifically, written responses to the question, “Overall, what words would you use to describe yourself as an employee?” were coded and categorized into the five dimensions.

I hypothesized that employees who were classified as conscientious, would be more likely to not feel “stuck” in their job. In a post hoc analysis, it was discovered that in fact it was employees categorized as open to experience, who were likely to not feel “stuck” in their job.

Each of the five characteristics were examined using a two-sample z test for proportions. Through these tests, we found that there is sufficient evidence at the 0.05 level to suggest that, of those that are open to experience, the proportion that do not feel “stuck” is greater than the proportion that do feel “stuck.” No such relationship emerged with respect to the Big Five characteristic of conscientiousness. Managerial implications and areas for future research are discussed.