Title

Improving the Interview Skills of a Military Veteran Using Behavioral Skills Training

Poster Number

17C

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Corey Stocco

Faculty Mentor Email

cstocco@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

A majority of post-9/11 veterans have reported obtaining gainful employment as a notable challenge when adjusting to civilian life (Zogas, 2017). Behavioral skills training (BST) has been shown to be an effective and socially valid method for teaching interview skills, but has yet to be evaluated with military veterans. We used a concurrent multiple baseline design across skills to extend the existing research on interview training by using BST to teach appropriate content and duration of answers and to reduce the filled pauses of a military veteran. Because social validity is a critique of programs currently offered to veterans, we also assessed the acceptability of procedures and outcomes. Training effects were evaluated through simulated interviews conducted by the first author. Results show that BST produced improvements in all target skills. The participant reported that he was satisfied with training outcomes. However, he withdrew from participation after 13 sessions and rated the acceptability of training procedures less favorably.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Improving the Interview Skills of a Military Veteran Using Behavioral Skills Training

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

A majority of post-9/11 veterans have reported obtaining gainful employment as a notable challenge when adjusting to civilian life (Zogas, 2017). Behavioral skills training (BST) has been shown to be an effective and socially valid method for teaching interview skills, but has yet to be evaluated with military veterans. We used a concurrent multiple baseline design across skills to extend the existing research on interview training by using BST to teach appropriate content and duration of answers and to reduce the filled pauses of a military veteran. Because social validity is a critique of programs currently offered to veterans, we also assessed the acceptability of procedures and outcomes. Training effects were evaluated through simulated interviews conducted by the first author. Results show that BST produced improvements in all target skills. The participant reported that he was satisfied with training outcomes. However, he withdrew from participation after 13 sessions and rated the acceptability of training procedures less favorably.