Title

The use of a platelet rich plasma injection for a 2nd degree ulnar collateral ligament sprain in a female Olympic water polo player

Poster Number

29

Lead Author Major

Athletic Training

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Christopher Ludwig

Faculty Mentor Department

Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Background: A female Olympic level water polo player sustained a valgus force to the elbow while throwing during practice resulting in a 2nd ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) sprain. The patient’s injury was confirmed through evaluation by an orthopedic physician and diagnostic imaging. The athlete wanted to be cleared and pain free for prior to participation in an Olympic qualifying event six weeks post her UCL injury. Treatment: Outcomes were assessed using a standard a non-operative rehabilitation program timeline for an UCL sprain, and active range of motion measurements pre/post PRP injection. One-week post injury, athlete received the platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection. Days 4-7 active range of motion exercises and strengthening exercises were done to regain the deficits in range of motion and strength. Day 7 athlete was pain free with full active range of motion. Week two, the patient began strengthening the shoulder and elbow, and participating in non-contact swimming. Week three, the patient began proprioceptive exercise. Week four, the patient was full contact and pain free. Results: The patient had full pain free active range of motion in all ranges one week post injection compared to the traditional treatment of being immobilized during the same phase. The patient was full contact and pain free by week four compared to the 7-10 week timeline given for rehabilitation without the injection. Uniqueness: PRP injections for UCL sprains are becoming more popular; however, it is not a standard treatment. There are very few evidence based rehabilitation or return to play protocols. This case can add to the body of knowledge regarding the use of platelet rich plasma injections for grade two UCL sprains. Conclusions: Based upon the standard rehabilitation time frame for a non-operative UCL sprain the PRP injection, in conjunction with a rehabilitation program, shortened the return to play timeframe by two weeks.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 12:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 30th, 10:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

The use of a platelet rich plasma injection for a 2nd degree ulnar collateral ligament sprain in a female Olympic water polo player

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Background: A female Olympic level water polo player sustained a valgus force to the elbow while throwing during practice resulting in a 2nd ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) sprain. The patient’s injury was confirmed through evaluation by an orthopedic physician and diagnostic imaging. The athlete wanted to be cleared and pain free for prior to participation in an Olympic qualifying event six weeks post her UCL injury. Treatment: Outcomes were assessed using a standard a non-operative rehabilitation program timeline for an UCL sprain, and active range of motion measurements pre/post PRP injection. One-week post injury, athlete received the platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection. Days 4-7 active range of motion exercises and strengthening exercises were done to regain the deficits in range of motion and strength. Day 7 athlete was pain free with full active range of motion. Week two, the patient began strengthening the shoulder and elbow, and participating in non-contact swimming. Week three, the patient began proprioceptive exercise. Week four, the patient was full contact and pain free. Results: The patient had full pain free active range of motion in all ranges one week post injection compared to the traditional treatment of being immobilized during the same phase. The patient was full contact and pain free by week four compared to the 7-10 week timeline given for rehabilitation without the injection. Uniqueness: PRP injections for UCL sprains are becoming more popular; however, it is not a standard treatment. There are very few evidence based rehabilitation or return to play protocols. This case can add to the body of knowledge regarding the use of platelet rich plasma injections for grade two UCL sprains. Conclusions: Based upon the standard rehabilitation time frame for a non-operative UCL sprain the PRP injection, in conjunction with a rehabilitation program, shortened the return to play timeframe by two weeks.