Title

South Asian Americans in Law

Poster Number

16

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Xiaojing Zhou

Faculty Mentor Department

English

Abstract/Artist Statement

South Asians have been in this country for centuries, and have made significant contributions to American democracy, especially to its inclusiveness through practice in the law profession. Yet, their contributions are little known to the general American public, and they continue to face discrimination. This paper examines the possible connections between racial/ethnic discrimination South Asian Americans have faced throughout history, and the differences they have made in American democracy through participation in the law profession. When South Asians first began to migrate to the United States, a majority of them worked as laborers. As a people colonized by the British, they continued to suffer from the legacies of colonialism and racism in the United States. The Immigration Act of 1917 designated an “Asiatic Barred Zone,” a region that covered much of Asia and the Pacific Islands, from which people could not immigrate. Court cases such as United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind (1923) ruled that South Asians were ineligible for U.S. citizenship, leading to the revoking of citizenship from those who had been naturalized U.S. citizens. But the United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind also demonstrates South Asians fight for equality. Since the early twentieth century, South Asian immigrants and Americans have actively involved in the struggle for equal rights of people of color in the United States through participation in politics and law. Dalip Singh Saund, the first Indian American member of the House of Representatives from California and Srikanth Srinivasan, a judge of the United States Court of Appeals, are two examples of South Asian Americans who have not only made their mark in the legal community, but also contributed to making American democracy more exclusive. This paper highlights South Asian Americans role in law as an instrument for positive social change.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 12:00 PM

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Apr 30th, 10:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

South Asian Americans in Law

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

South Asians have been in this country for centuries, and have made significant contributions to American democracy, especially to its inclusiveness through practice in the law profession. Yet, their contributions are little known to the general American public, and they continue to face discrimination. This paper examines the possible connections between racial/ethnic discrimination South Asian Americans have faced throughout history, and the differences they have made in American democracy through participation in the law profession. When South Asians first began to migrate to the United States, a majority of them worked as laborers. As a people colonized by the British, they continued to suffer from the legacies of colonialism and racism in the United States. The Immigration Act of 1917 designated an “Asiatic Barred Zone,” a region that covered much of Asia and the Pacific Islands, from which people could not immigrate. Court cases such as United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind (1923) ruled that South Asians were ineligible for U.S. citizenship, leading to the revoking of citizenship from those who had been naturalized U.S. citizens. But the United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind also demonstrates South Asians fight for equality. Since the early twentieth century, South Asian immigrants and Americans have actively involved in the struggle for equal rights of people of color in the United States through participation in politics and law. Dalip Singh Saund, the first Indian American member of the House of Representatives from California and Srikanth Srinivasan, a judge of the United States Court of Appeals, are two examples of South Asian Americans who have not only made their mark in the legal community, but also contributed to making American democracy more exclusive. This paper highlights South Asian Americans role in law as an instrument for positive social change.