Title

Examining the Interaction of the T. vaginalis Homologues of RAD51 and DMC1 with TvBRCA2 via Co-Immunoprecipitation

Poster Number

12

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Lisa Wrischnik

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Trichomonas vaginalis, a single-celled protozoan parasite, is the causal agent of the sexually transmitted infection trichomoniasis. Despite only having been observed reproducing by binary fission, the protozoan possesses a genome containing multiple genes known to be active in meiosis, implying that the organism may display a form of “cell sex.” One of these genes encodes the RAD51 protein, which is involved in DNA repair of double-stranded breaks during homologous recombination as well as repair after DNA damage. The DMC1 protein is also involved in repairing double stranded breaks, but only acts during meiosis. Both RAD51 and DMC1 may form a complex with the BRCA2 protein homologue to facilitate attachment to double-stranded breaks; specifically, RAD51 in other organisms has been shown to bind to repeat regions in the BRCA2 protein. Our project involves examining the interaction of both the Trichomonas vaginalis RAD51 and DMC1 homologues with the BRCA2 homologue using co-immunoprecipitation experiments to assay for protein-protein interactions.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 12:00 PM

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Apr 30th, 10:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

Examining the Interaction of the T. vaginalis Homologues of RAD51 and DMC1 with TvBRCA2 via Co-Immunoprecipitation

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Trichomonas vaginalis, a single-celled protozoan parasite, is the causal agent of the sexually transmitted infection trichomoniasis. Despite only having been observed reproducing by binary fission, the protozoan possesses a genome containing multiple genes known to be active in meiosis, implying that the organism may display a form of “cell sex.” One of these genes encodes the RAD51 protein, which is involved in DNA repair of double-stranded breaks during homologous recombination as well as repair after DNA damage. The DMC1 protein is also involved in repairing double stranded breaks, but only acts during meiosis. Both RAD51 and DMC1 may form a complex with the BRCA2 protein homologue to facilitate attachment to double-stranded breaks; specifically, RAD51 in other organisms has been shown to bind to repeat regions in the BRCA2 protein. Our project involves examining the interaction of both the Trichomonas vaginalis RAD51 and DMC1 homologues with the BRCA2 homologue using co-immunoprecipitation experiments to assay for protein-protein interactions.