Title

An Analysis of Education in Sub-Saharan Africa

Poster Number

11

Lead Author Major

Applied Economics

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

William Herrin

Faculty Mentor Department

Economics

Abstract/Artist Statement

Even though Sub-Saharan Africa has made considerable progress; according to the World Bank, all of the other world regions surpass Sub- Saharan Africa in primary completion rate for both sexes . This work uses regression analysis to estimate the determinants of the rate of primary school completion. The primary school completion rate is the dependent variable in this study and it is defined as the “total number of new entrants in the last grade of primary education, regardless of age, expressed as percentage of the total population of the theoretical entrance age to the last grade of primary” (UNESCO Institute for Statistics) . I will be using annual data that account for all of the 46 Sub-Saharan African countries. The explanatory variables are government expenditure on education, income, and childhood employment . My hypothesis is that government expenditure on education, income, and childhood employment will explain why the primary completion rate is low in Sub-Saharan Africa. More specifically, I expect that there will be a positive correlation coefficient for government expenditure and income and a negative correlation coefficient for childhood employment.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 12:00 PM

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Apr 30th, 10:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 PM

An Analysis of Education in Sub-Saharan Africa

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Even though Sub-Saharan Africa has made considerable progress; according to the World Bank, all of the other world regions surpass Sub- Saharan Africa in primary completion rate for both sexes . This work uses regression analysis to estimate the determinants of the rate of primary school completion. The primary school completion rate is the dependent variable in this study and it is defined as the “total number of new entrants in the last grade of primary education, regardless of age, expressed as percentage of the total population of the theoretical entrance age to the last grade of primary” (UNESCO Institute for Statistics) . I will be using annual data that account for all of the 46 Sub-Saharan African countries. The explanatory variables are government expenditure on education, income, and childhood employment . My hypothesis is that government expenditure on education, income, and childhood employment will explain why the primary completion rate is low in Sub-Saharan Africa. More specifically, I expect that there will be a positive correlation coefficient for government expenditure and income and a negative correlation coefficient for childhood employment.