Title

Feminism in Engineering

Lead Author Major

Civil Engineering

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jeffery Hole

Faculty Mentor Department

English

Abstract/Artist Statement

While the field of engineering is often given credit for creating innovative new technologies and contributing to what many consider to be social, historical, and economic “progress,” engineering as a discipline is not innocent of producing and perpetuating the material and structural realities that work against women and minorities. From the entanglements of early engineering with the war machine and state military power, to more recent engineering feats involving computer programming and sexist video games, engineers have fallen victim to societal norms and expectations. The intent of this research is to unveil the connection between the stereotypes of women in our society and how they have impacted the field of engineering. Drawing on the works of Henry Petroski, Anita Sarkeesian, Simone de Beauvoir, and Judith Butler, among others, I focus on the concepts of feminism and how the early as well as current entanglements of engineering have created a barrier between women and their full participation in this field. In my paper and slide presentation, I examine how society has kept women out of engineering fields, and I make a case for how feminist theory can combat the inequality that exists in the profession today.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

30-4-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

30-4-2016 3:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 30th, 1:00 PM Apr 30th, 3:00 PM

Feminism in Engineering

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

While the field of engineering is often given credit for creating innovative new technologies and contributing to what many consider to be social, historical, and economic “progress,” engineering as a discipline is not innocent of producing and perpetuating the material and structural realities that work against women and minorities. From the entanglements of early engineering with the war machine and state military power, to more recent engineering feats involving computer programming and sexist video games, engineers have fallen victim to societal norms and expectations. The intent of this research is to unveil the connection between the stereotypes of women in our society and how they have impacted the field of engineering. Drawing on the works of Henry Petroski, Anita Sarkeesian, Simone de Beauvoir, and Judith Butler, among others, I focus on the concepts of feminism and how the early as well as current entanglements of engineering have created a barrier between women and their full participation in this field. In my paper and slide presentation, I examine how society has kept women out of engineering fields, and I make a case for how feminist theory can combat the inequality that exists in the profession today.