Title

Blood Meal Analysis of Culex thriambus and Culiseta particeps

Poster Number

31

Lead Author Major

Pre-Dentistry

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Tara Thiemann

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Mosquitos are common vectors of diseases such as West Nile Virus (WNV). While there has been significant research on some California vector species such as Culex tarsalis and Culex pipiens, relatively little research has been done on Culex thriambus and Culex particeps, two resident species of mosquito in California that may contribute to the spread of diseases. By accurately determining the feeding patterns of these species we can attain a better understanding of what possible roles they play in the transmission of pathogens. Bloodmeal analysis was conducted by extracting DNA from bloodmeals of the abdomens of female mosquitos then subjecting it to targeted nested PCR and DNA sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I which enables accurate identification to a species level. Bloodmeal analysis of these two mosquito species collected from Lake County, California in 2014-2015, shows us that Cx. thriambus and Cs. particeps feed on a combination of avian and mammalian hosts.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 1:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 3:30 PM

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Apr 30th, 1:30 AM Apr 30th, 3:30 PM

Blood Meal Analysis of Culex thriambus and Culiseta particeps

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Mosquitos are common vectors of diseases such as West Nile Virus (WNV). While there has been significant research on some California vector species such as Culex tarsalis and Culex pipiens, relatively little research has been done on Culex thriambus and Culex particeps, two resident species of mosquito in California that may contribute to the spread of diseases. By accurately determining the feeding patterns of these species we can attain a better understanding of what possible roles they play in the transmission of pathogens. Bloodmeal analysis was conducted by extracting DNA from bloodmeals of the abdomens of female mosquitos then subjecting it to targeted nested PCR and DNA sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I which enables accurate identification to a species level. Bloodmeal analysis of these two mosquito species collected from Lake County, California in 2014-2015, shows us that Cx. thriambus and Cs. particeps feed on a combination of avian and mammalian hosts.