Title

Do Speyeria callippe populations show effects of human habitat disturbance?

Poster Number

27

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Ryan Hill

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Speyeria butterflies have been experiencing a decline due to habitat disturbance by humans. Unlike larger endangered animals, Speyeria is not acutely affected by factors such as over collecting, but more so by loss of food and land resources, such as its host plant Viola pedunculata. In particular, the Bay Area has been prone to extensive development and encroachment by humans, and S. callippe callippe has consequently been classified as a Federally Endangered Species since late 1997, with only two recognized surviving populations. While there has not been extensive research on the exact reasons for decline, evidence suggests that the decline is due to growing urbanization and recreational use of the butterfly’s habitat. Human caused population extinctions lead to a reduction in population connectivity and genetically separated populations of S. callippe. However, populations may also be naturally subdivided with genetically separated populations, making it difficult to know what is natural for the species. For example, putatively fragmented populations in the San Francisco Bay Area may be just as connected as populations in relatively undisturbed parts of California’s north and south coast ranges that are naturally subdivided. Our goal is to establish whether S. callippe population structure has been impacted by human habitat alteration to help guide management of this species. If human habitat alteration has caused a change in population connectivity in the Bay Area, then there should be more population differentiation there relative to north and south coast range populations. Using the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit I, haplotypes will be analyzed to highlight the differences within and among areas. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) and Fst will be used to assess genetic variation to confirm or refute our suspicion of population fragmentation in the Bay Area.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 1:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 3:30 PM

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Apr 30th, 1:30 AM Apr 30th, 3:30 PM

Do Speyeria callippe populations show effects of human habitat disturbance?

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Speyeria butterflies have been experiencing a decline due to habitat disturbance by humans. Unlike larger endangered animals, Speyeria is not acutely affected by factors such as over collecting, but more so by loss of food and land resources, such as its host plant Viola pedunculata. In particular, the Bay Area has been prone to extensive development and encroachment by humans, and S. callippe callippe has consequently been classified as a Federally Endangered Species since late 1997, with only two recognized surviving populations. While there has not been extensive research on the exact reasons for decline, evidence suggests that the decline is due to growing urbanization and recreational use of the butterfly’s habitat. Human caused population extinctions lead to a reduction in population connectivity and genetically separated populations of S. callippe. However, populations may also be naturally subdivided with genetically separated populations, making it difficult to know what is natural for the species. For example, putatively fragmented populations in the San Francisco Bay Area may be just as connected as populations in relatively undisturbed parts of California’s north and south coast ranges that are naturally subdivided. Our goal is to establish whether S. callippe population structure has been impacted by human habitat alteration to help guide management of this species. If human habitat alteration has caused a change in population connectivity in the Bay Area, then there should be more population differentiation there relative to north and south coast range populations. Using the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit I, haplotypes will be analyzed to highlight the differences within and among areas. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) and Fst will be used to assess genetic variation to confirm or refute our suspicion of population fragmentation in the Bay Area.