Title

Bloodfeeding Patterns of Culex tarsalis and Culex pipiens Mosquitoes in San Joaquin County

Poster Number

25

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Tara Thiemann

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

West Nile virus (WNV) is a zoonotic virus that causes flu-like symptoms, encephalitis, and sometimes death, in humans. The virus was first detected in the eastern hemisphere in the 1930s, and it was introduced to the United States in 1999. The virus spread relatively quickly across North America and reached California by 2003. Since then, there have been 4,805 reported human cases with 176 cases resulting in death. Many bird and mammal species act as a host for the virus in California, and the virus can then be transmitted to other species by two primary vectors: Culex tarsalis and Culex pipiens. The bloodfeeding pattern of these mosquitoes is an important component in WNV transmission. To better understand these patterns, a total of 614 specimens of Cx. tarsalis and Cx. pipiens were collected from twelve different habitat types in the San Joaquin County between August 2009 and November 2012. Bloodmeal DNA was extracted from each mosquito and a 658-base pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome coxidase I (COI) was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Successful amplifications were then sequenced, and the resulting sequences were submitted to BoldSystems, an online DNA barcode database, for species identification. Over 80% of the bloodmeals were successfully identified. There were 77 different host species: 44% were mammalian and 56% were avian. The most commonly fed upon species by Cx. pipiens and Cx. tarsalis were cattle (11.70%), house finches (8.97%), and American robins (6.25%). The majority of bloodmeals were collected from riparian (n=84) and agricultural (n=77) habitats. The data from this bloodmeal study shows the local feeding patterns of the two most common vectors of WNV in California based on habitat type, location, and seasonal factors, giving insight into local transmission of WNV.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

30-4-2016 1:30 AM

End Date

30-4-2016 3:30 PM

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Apr 30th, 1:30 AM Apr 30th, 3:30 PM

Bloodfeeding Patterns of Culex tarsalis and Culex pipiens Mosquitoes in San Joaquin County

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

West Nile virus (WNV) is a zoonotic virus that causes flu-like symptoms, encephalitis, and sometimes death, in humans. The virus was first detected in the eastern hemisphere in the 1930s, and it was introduced to the United States in 1999. The virus spread relatively quickly across North America and reached California by 2003. Since then, there have been 4,805 reported human cases with 176 cases resulting in death. Many bird and mammal species act as a host for the virus in California, and the virus can then be transmitted to other species by two primary vectors: Culex tarsalis and Culex pipiens. The bloodfeeding pattern of these mosquitoes is an important component in WNV transmission. To better understand these patterns, a total of 614 specimens of Cx. tarsalis and Cx. pipiens were collected from twelve different habitat types in the San Joaquin County between August 2009 and November 2012. Bloodmeal DNA was extracted from each mosquito and a 658-base pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome coxidase I (COI) was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Successful amplifications were then sequenced, and the resulting sequences were submitted to BoldSystems, an online DNA barcode database, for species identification. Over 80% of the bloodmeals were successfully identified. There were 77 different host species: 44% were mammalian and 56% were avian. The most commonly fed upon species by Cx. pipiens and Cx. tarsalis were cattle (11.70%), house finches (8.97%), and American robins (6.25%). The majority of bloodmeals were collected from riparian (n=84) and agricultural (n=77) habitats. The data from this bloodmeal study shows the local feeding patterns of the two most common vectors of WNV in California based on habitat type, location, and seasonal factors, giving insight into local transmission of WNV.