Title

Can Project Unbreakable Break Rape Stereotypes?

Poster Number

20

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jacqueline Austin

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

Research shows that women who have lower rape myth rejection are less likely to label their experience as rape and, consequently, may suffer more negative symptoms than women who are able to classify their experiences as rape. Studies also show that sexual assault education can lead to a change in attitude that might result in higher rape myth rejection. This study sought to research the effects of attending a sexual assault awareness presentation on scores of rape myth rejection. Participants either attended or did not attend an event with two speakers from Project Unbreakable, a sexual assault awareness campaign, and subsequent survey scores were compared. Surveys were shared online via social media and 87 University of the Pacific students responded to the surveys. Using a one-tailed independent samples t-test it was found that there was no significant difference in rape myth rejection scores of participants that did or did not attend the event.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

25-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 4:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 2:00 PM Apr 25th, 4:00 PM

Can Project Unbreakable Break Rape Stereotypes?

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Research shows that women who have lower rape myth rejection are less likely to label their experience as rape and, consequently, may suffer more negative symptoms than women who are able to classify their experiences as rape. Studies also show that sexual assault education can lead to a change in attitude that might result in higher rape myth rejection. This study sought to research the effects of attending a sexual assault awareness presentation on scores of rape myth rejection. Participants either attended or did not attend an event with two speakers from Project Unbreakable, a sexual assault awareness campaign, and subsequent survey scores were compared. Surveys were shared online via social media and 87 University of the Pacific students responded to the surveys. Using a one-tailed independent samples t-test it was found that there was no significant difference in rape myth rejection scores of participants that did or did not attend the event.