Title

Anthropogenic effects of urban watershed management on nutrient cycling

Poster Number

10

Lead Author Major

Environmental Science

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Laura Rademacher

Faculty Mentor Department

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Understanding the extent to which humans effect biogeochemical cycles is vital to preserving the environment. Investigations in the urban environment are particularly challenging as they are more complex than natural systems. Studies that focus on anthropogenic impacts of watershed modification provide management agencies with the information needed to evaluate how effective their practices are at maintaining and improving water quality in urban areas. The watersheds in the East Bay are heavily managed urban systems influenced by dense populations, industry, and mining, all of which have the potential to negatively impact the hydrology of the area. Soil and water samples were collected from three lakes in the East Bay area to evaluate the impacts of these signs of urbanization on small, upstream reservoirs: Don Castro, Lake Anza, and Lake Aliso. These three lakes are located near a major freeway interchange, an urban park, and an abandoned mine site, respectively. Due to their differences in alteration, this allows for both qualitative, and to some extent quantitative, analysis of anthropogenic effects on the lakes. Sediment cores were collected from each of the lakes and are were analyzed for metal content. Trends in metal content in the sediment of each of the three lakes reflects the surrounding land use and how this has evolved over time.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

25-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 4:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 2:00 PM Apr 25th, 4:00 PM

Anthropogenic effects of urban watershed management on nutrient cycling

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Understanding the extent to which humans effect biogeochemical cycles is vital to preserving the environment. Investigations in the urban environment are particularly challenging as they are more complex than natural systems. Studies that focus on anthropogenic impacts of watershed modification provide management agencies with the information needed to evaluate how effective their practices are at maintaining and improving water quality in urban areas. The watersheds in the East Bay are heavily managed urban systems influenced by dense populations, industry, and mining, all of which have the potential to negatively impact the hydrology of the area. Soil and water samples were collected from three lakes in the East Bay area to evaluate the impacts of these signs of urbanization on small, upstream reservoirs: Don Castro, Lake Anza, and Lake Aliso. These three lakes are located near a major freeway interchange, an urban park, and an abandoned mine site, respectively. Due to their differences in alteration, this allows for both qualitative, and to some extent quantitative, analysis of anthropogenic effects on the lakes. Sediment cores were collected from each of the lakes and are were analyzed for metal content. Trends in metal content in the sediment of each of the three lakes reflects the surrounding land use and how this has evolved over time.