Title

Determining the Correlation Between the Sexual Dimorphic Eyes and Mating Ritual of a Crustacean

Poster Number

5

Lead Author Major

Biochemistry and Biology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Ajna Rivera

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Sexual dimorphism is the event in which a male and female of the same species exhibits different physical aspects, aside from the obvious genitalia. This is important as it raises many important evolutionary questions. Sexual dimorphism in the class of Ostracoda and specifically in the species Euphilomedes carcharodonta and Euphilomedes morini can be seen in regards to their eyes. Male E. carcharodonta and E. morini have large image forming eyes, while females have only eyespots. We strive to answer why and how these eyes exhibit this particular aspect of sexual dimorphism. Previous studies have shown that sexual dimorphism is at least partially selected for by predation on males, but not females. However, this does not rule out the possibility of sexual selection. Here, we propose a simple paternity testing strategy combined with mating competition experiments to test whether eyes are sexually selected. First, we implement a new protocol to find possible SNP or single nucleotide polymorphisms in their genome, create primers around those sites, and test those primers to see if those possible sites are positive SNP sites. Second, we blind male Euphilomedes carcharodonta and place them in a tank to with unblinded female Euphilomedes carcharodonta as well as mock-blinded males. Any resultant embryos will then be subjected to the paternity test using SNP analysis.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

25-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 4:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 2:00 PM Apr 25th, 4:00 PM

Determining the Correlation Between the Sexual Dimorphic Eyes and Mating Ritual of a Crustacean

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Sexual dimorphism is the event in which a male and female of the same species exhibits different physical aspects, aside from the obvious genitalia. This is important as it raises many important evolutionary questions. Sexual dimorphism in the class of Ostracoda and specifically in the species Euphilomedes carcharodonta and Euphilomedes morini can be seen in regards to their eyes. Male E. carcharodonta and E. morini have large image forming eyes, while females have only eyespots. We strive to answer why and how these eyes exhibit this particular aspect of sexual dimorphism. Previous studies have shown that sexual dimorphism is at least partially selected for by predation on males, but not females. However, this does not rule out the possibility of sexual selection. Here, we propose a simple paternity testing strategy combined with mating competition experiments to test whether eyes are sexually selected. First, we implement a new protocol to find possible SNP or single nucleotide polymorphisms in their genome, create primers around those sites, and test those primers to see if those possible sites are positive SNP sites. Second, we blind male Euphilomedes carcharodonta and place them in a tank to with unblinded female Euphilomedes carcharodonta as well as mock-blinded males. Any resultant embryos will then be subjected to the paternity test using SNP analysis.