Title

Water vapor effects on the sintering of solid oxide electrolytes

Poster Number

35

Lead Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Tien Roehling

Faculty Mentor Department

Engineering and Computer Science

Abstract/Artist Statement

Water vapor effects on the sintering of solid oxide electrolytes Presenter: S. Stefan Soezeri Advisor: Tien Tran Roehling Department of Mechanical Engineering In solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), the electrolyte is often a dense, fluorite-structured metal oxide, such as zirconium oxide or cerium oxide. In comparison to these conventional materials, which require operating temperatures in the range of 800-1000 °C, bismuth oxide has demonstrated enhanced oxygen conductivity at intermediate temperatures (500-700 °C). To manufacture these metal oxide electrolytes, the ceramic powders are compressed and then bonded by a solid state technique, called sintering. Densification during sintering mainly occurs by surface and volume diffusion, and to a lesser extent, by evaporation-condensation. In this study, the effect of water vapor on bismuth oxide sintering is investigated. An experimental apparatus was designed in order to allow sintering in a tube furnace to occur in air, or under flowing water vapor at 1 atm. The preliminary results demonstrate a clear enhancement in densification in the presence of water vapor. The increase in densification rates observed may be due to the formation of high vapor pressure metal oxyhydroxides, which can increase the contribution of evaporation condensation to densification. Although a facile and inexpensive solution, sintering in water vapor-containing atmospheres can effectively improve the efficiency SOFC electrolyte fabrication.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

25-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2015 12:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 10:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

Water vapor effects on the sintering of solid oxide electrolytes

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Water vapor effects on the sintering of solid oxide electrolytes Presenter: S. Stefan Soezeri Advisor: Tien Tran Roehling Department of Mechanical Engineering In solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), the electrolyte is often a dense, fluorite-structured metal oxide, such as zirconium oxide or cerium oxide. In comparison to these conventional materials, which require operating temperatures in the range of 800-1000 °C, bismuth oxide has demonstrated enhanced oxygen conductivity at intermediate temperatures (500-700 °C). To manufacture these metal oxide electrolytes, the ceramic powders are compressed and then bonded by a solid state technique, called sintering. Densification during sintering mainly occurs by surface and volume diffusion, and to a lesser extent, by evaporation-condensation. In this study, the effect of water vapor on bismuth oxide sintering is investigated. An experimental apparatus was designed in order to allow sintering in a tube furnace to occur in air, or under flowing water vapor at 1 atm. The preliminary results demonstrate a clear enhancement in densification in the presence of water vapor. The increase in densification rates observed may be due to the formation of high vapor pressure metal oxyhydroxides, which can increase the contribution of evaporation condensation to densification. Although a facile and inexpensive solution, sintering in water vapor-containing atmospheres can effectively improve the efficiency SOFC electrolyte fabrication.