Title

Improved antiparasitic activity by incorporation of organosilane entities into half-sandwich ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes

Poster Number

21

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Kirkwood Land

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Trichomoniasis is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases that is caused by Trichomonas vaginalis. This protozoan parasite is known to infect both males and females in the urogenital tract and is transmitted through sexual intercourse. Usually males do not have symptoms whereas females do. Without treatment, infected individuals are more susceptible to HIV, cervical or prostate cancer and preterm delivery. A common problem that arises from the treatment of parasitic diseases is the emergence of new strains of T. vaginalis that have developed resistance to widely- used and cost- effective drugs such as metronidazole or tinidazole. Therefore, the development of new novel treatments is needed. Our research was to test strain G3 T. vaginalis against novel thiosemicarbazones as possible new treatment for treating trichomoniasis. Thiosemicarbazone compounds that are coordinated with ruthenium (II) and rhodium(III) were screened in order to compare the effectiveness with uncoordinated drug compounds already known to be effective against trichomoniasis. We hypothesize that coordinated complexes, ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) added to thiosemicarbazone, will have a greater inhibitory effect on the G3 strain of Trichomonas vaginalis. We carried out in vitro antitrichomonal assays to test the effectiveness of newly created compounds against T. vaginalis. The method we used is to conduct this research project determined the half maximal inhibitory concentration, or the IC50. It quantifies the effectiveness of a substance in inhibiting the cell growth of T. vaginalis by 50%. The doseresponse curve was constructed from collected inhibitory growth data to determine the IC50 concentrations. Ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) complexes displayed greater inhibitory effects against the G3 strain when compared to complexes that had no group additions. When analyzed further, ruthenium(II) complexes had lower inhibitory action in comparison to rhodium(III) complexes.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

25-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2015 12:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 25th, 10:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

Improved antiparasitic activity by incorporation of organosilane entities into half-sandwich ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Trichomoniasis is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases that is caused by Trichomonas vaginalis. This protozoan parasite is known to infect both males and females in the urogenital tract and is transmitted through sexual intercourse. Usually males do not have symptoms whereas females do. Without treatment, infected individuals are more susceptible to HIV, cervical or prostate cancer and preterm delivery. A common problem that arises from the treatment of parasitic diseases is the emergence of new strains of T. vaginalis that have developed resistance to widely- used and cost- effective drugs such as metronidazole or tinidazole. Therefore, the development of new novel treatments is needed. Our research was to test strain G3 T. vaginalis against novel thiosemicarbazones as possible new treatment for treating trichomoniasis. Thiosemicarbazone compounds that are coordinated with ruthenium (II) and rhodium(III) were screened in order to compare the effectiveness with uncoordinated drug compounds already known to be effective against trichomoniasis. We hypothesize that coordinated complexes, ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) added to thiosemicarbazone, will have a greater inhibitory effect on the G3 strain of Trichomonas vaginalis. We carried out in vitro antitrichomonal assays to test the effectiveness of newly created compounds against T. vaginalis. The method we used is to conduct this research project determined the half maximal inhibitory concentration, or the IC50. It quantifies the effectiveness of a substance in inhibiting the cell growth of T. vaginalis by 50%. The doseresponse curve was constructed from collected inhibitory growth data to determine the IC50 concentrations. Ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) complexes displayed greater inhibitory effects against the G3 strain when compared to complexes that had no group additions. When analyzed further, ruthenium(II) complexes had lower inhibitory action in comparison to rhodium(III) complexes.