Title

Predicting the effects of global warming: the upper critical thermal limits of the tungara frog (Engystomops pustulosus)

Poster Number

16

Lead Author Major

Pre-Dentistry and Pre-Pharmacy

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Hilton Oyamaguchi

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Understanding how temperature affects amphibian populations is fundamental to predict the consequences of global climate change. Global mean surface temperatures are projected to continue increasing. We investigated whether Tungara frog tadpoles (Engystomops pustulosus), a species widely distributed in Central America lowlands, can adjust their upper critical thermal maximum (CTmax) response after being acclimated to different temperatures (21ºC, 28ºC, and 31ºC). For each acclimation temperature, we started our experiment with 25 tadpoles from each brood (n = 7). We determined the CTmax for each treatment placing tadpoles in a Petri dish with water and increased the temperature 1ºC per minute. As soon as they lost righting response, we stopped the experiment and let them to recover. For all treatments, the CTmax was 42.09ºC ± 1.5ºC (n = 75). For acclimation under 21ºC, the CTmax was 41.5ºC ± 1.15ºC (n = 29), under 28ºC the CT max was 42.2ºC ± 1.6ºC (n = 29), and under 31ºC the CTmax was 42.9ºC ± 1.43ºC (n = 17). We found significant differences between the treatments 21ºC and 31ºC (p = 0.006). This experiment showed that Tungara frogs are able to adjust their upper critical thermal maximum by on average 1.4ºC. This type of research is fundamental to determining the acceptable range of temperature fluctuations in amphibians habitats and predicting the effects of global warming in amphibian populations from the tropics.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

25-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2015 12:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 10:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

Predicting the effects of global warming: the upper critical thermal limits of the tungara frog (Engystomops pustulosus)

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Understanding how temperature affects amphibian populations is fundamental to predict the consequences of global climate change. Global mean surface temperatures are projected to continue increasing. We investigated whether Tungara frog tadpoles (Engystomops pustulosus), a species widely distributed in Central America lowlands, can adjust their upper critical thermal maximum (CTmax) response after being acclimated to different temperatures (21ºC, 28ºC, and 31ºC). For each acclimation temperature, we started our experiment with 25 tadpoles from each brood (n = 7). We determined the CTmax for each treatment placing tadpoles in a Petri dish with water and increased the temperature 1ºC per minute. As soon as they lost righting response, we stopped the experiment and let them to recover. For all treatments, the CTmax was 42.09ºC ± 1.5ºC (n = 75). For acclimation under 21ºC, the CTmax was 41.5ºC ± 1.15ºC (n = 29), under 28ºC the CT max was 42.2ºC ± 1.6ºC (n = 29), and under 31ºC the CTmax was 42.9ºC ± 1.43ºC (n = 17). We found significant differences between the treatments 21ºC and 31ºC (p = 0.006). This experiment showed that Tungara frogs are able to adjust their upper critical thermal maximum by on average 1.4ºC. This type of research is fundamental to determining the acceptable range of temperature fluctuations in amphibians habitats and predicting the effects of global warming in amphibian populations from the tropics.