Title

The Gender-Specific Differences in Body Image Perception and Its Effects on Physical Health

Poster Number

2

Lead Author Major

Health and Exercise Science

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Chris Ludwig

Faculty Mentor Department

Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Mark Van Ness

Abstract/Artist Statement

Physical activity and healthy eating are often targets of interventional studies to promote physical health. However, body image and an individual’s sense of self-worth contribute significantly to the likelihood of maintaining proper health habits (Gillen, 2015). Purpose: In the present study, we examined gender differences in body image perception and its effects on physical health. Methodology: A Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ; Keeton, Cash & Brown, 1990) was used to assess self-reported factors that contribute to the physical health of 98 undergraduate students (38 males and 60 females). Institutional Review for the study was approved, and each subject signed an informed consent prior to volunteering for the study. The MBSRQ examines specific responses in the following categories: Appearance Orientation, Appearance Evaluation, Fitness Evaluation, Health Evaluation, Fitness Orientation, Overweight Preoccupation, Self-Classified Weight, Body Area Satisfaction, and Health Orientation. Results: A multivariate analysis between genders revealed significant differences in the Appearance Orientation variable (partial eta= 0.072; p= 0.007) and the Overweight Preoccupation variable (partial eta= 0.131; p= 0.00). Rather than doing follow-up univariate analyses, a discriminate function analysis was performed to determine which variables contributed to the gender differences. The discriminant function analysis accurately predicted gender with 66.3% accuracy (Wilks’ Lambda= 0.869, p> 0.05), with the Overweight Preoccupation variable being the strongest contributing factor. Conclusion: There are strong gender differences in the body image attitudes of college students as evidenced by the multivariate analysis. Additionally, it appears the sub-scale for Overweight Preoccupation contributes the greatest to those gender differences.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

25-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2015 12:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 10:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

The Gender-Specific Differences in Body Image Perception and Its Effects on Physical Health

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Physical activity and healthy eating are often targets of interventional studies to promote physical health. However, body image and an individual’s sense of self-worth contribute significantly to the likelihood of maintaining proper health habits (Gillen, 2015). Purpose: In the present study, we examined gender differences in body image perception and its effects on physical health. Methodology: A Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ; Keeton, Cash & Brown, 1990) was used to assess self-reported factors that contribute to the physical health of 98 undergraduate students (38 males and 60 females). Institutional Review for the study was approved, and each subject signed an informed consent prior to volunteering for the study. The MBSRQ examines specific responses in the following categories: Appearance Orientation, Appearance Evaluation, Fitness Evaluation, Health Evaluation, Fitness Orientation, Overweight Preoccupation, Self-Classified Weight, Body Area Satisfaction, and Health Orientation. Results: A multivariate analysis between genders revealed significant differences in the Appearance Orientation variable (partial eta= 0.072; p= 0.007) and the Overweight Preoccupation variable (partial eta= 0.131; p= 0.00). Rather than doing follow-up univariate analyses, a discriminate function analysis was performed to determine which variables contributed to the gender differences. The discriminant function analysis accurately predicted gender with 66.3% accuracy (Wilks’ Lambda= 0.869, p> 0.05), with the Overweight Preoccupation variable being the strongest contributing factor. Conclusion: There are strong gender differences in the body image attitudes of college students as evidenced by the multivariate analysis. Additionally, it appears the sub-scale for Overweight Preoccupation contributes the greatest to those gender differences.