Title

Transverse Flux Correlation Function of Quasar Pairs

Lead Author Major

Physics & Applied Mathematics

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Isabelle Paris

Faculty Mentor Department

Physics

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Helene Flohic

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

James Hetrick

Abstract/Artist Statement

For the last five billion years the universe has been expanding in size at an increasing rate. With modern technology we are able to observe objects at very high redshift, which were created in the early universe. Being able to analyze and observe these objects allows us to put specific constraints on the universe (age, size, dark matter fraction…etc). Looking at the spectra of highly redshifted objects, such as quasars, we can see a series of absorption lines called the Lyman alpha forest. The angular correlation in the Lyman alpha spectra of quasar pairs allows us to measure the size of the absorbing objects. This works best at very small-scale (below one arcmin). The most recent use of this method consisted of 32 quasar pairs and only two of those had a sky separation below 1 arcmin (Coppolani et al., 2006). The sample size that is used in this work is from the SDSS-III DR12. This catalog has over 1500 quasars pairs below two arcmin separation, giving us much lower error bars, and therefore putting much better constraints on the cosmological parameters that can be inferred from the correlation function

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

25-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 4:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 2:00 PM Apr 25th, 4:00 PM

Transverse Flux Correlation Function of Quasar Pairs

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

For the last five billion years the universe has been expanding in size at an increasing rate. With modern technology we are able to observe objects at very high redshift, which were created in the early universe. Being able to analyze and observe these objects allows us to put specific constraints on the universe (age, size, dark matter fraction…etc). Looking at the spectra of highly redshifted objects, such as quasars, we can see a series of absorption lines called the Lyman alpha forest. The angular correlation in the Lyman alpha spectra of quasar pairs allows us to measure the size of the absorbing objects. This works best at very small-scale (below one arcmin). The most recent use of this method consisted of 32 quasar pairs and only two of those had a sky separation below 1 arcmin (Coppolani et al., 2006). The sample size that is used in this work is from the SDSS-III DR12. This catalog has over 1500 quasars pairs below two arcmin separation, giving us much lower error bars, and therefore putting much better constraints on the cosmological parameters that can be inferred from the correlation function