Title

Dances for Trio

Lead Author Major

Composition

Format

Composer's Club Concerts

Faculty Mentor Name

Francois Rose

Faculty Mentor Department

Conservatory of Music

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Robert Coburn

Abstract/Artist Statement

Dances for Trio (2014) is a three movement piece written for Bb clarinet, violin, and piano. This programmatic piece was inspired by 19th Century traditional ballroom dances. Though inspired by an older form of dance, the air of the piece is modal and untraditional in rhythm and technique. Movement I: The Grand March has its usual characteristic beginning; however, it loses this quality slowly as the violin and clarinet begin to disagree on which key the melody should be. This movement is very programmatic between these parts and the effect is purposely obvious. In that way this movement is the less serious of the three. It portrays more of a corny joke on how overly sophisticated individuals would argue while trying to make their presence known. Movement II: Waltz – The Waltz takes on a more serious turn and is the slow movement of the three. It begins with a simple ostinato plucked by the violin in the uneasy phrygian mode. This movement depicts the more serious side of young single individual at all a ball. Who should he ask to dance? The beginning nervousness turns into his heart racing and more uneasy as the purposed character asks a girl to dance with him. Then the piece becomes more beautiful, though still melodic, in the B section as he and she begin to become very found of one another. Lastly, they are then thrown back into reality and nervousness as they realize the dance is about to end. Movement III: Cotillion – Cotillion is a very freelance improvisatory dance with sashays across the dance floor and more intimate positions. This movement follows according to that original style. With sashays being depicted in the piano from time to time, this movement leaves moments for the instrumentalists to show off their virtuosity; just like dancers would at a ball. The instrumentalists also have intimate moments as the parts are often in unison or octaves, have elegant duets, or are in cannon together as they play simple playful melodies.

Location

Recital Hall

Start Date

29-4-2014 7:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2014 9:30 PM

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Apr 29th, 7:30 PM Apr 29th, 9:30 PM

Dances for Trio

Recital Hall

Dances for Trio (2014) is a three movement piece written for Bb clarinet, violin, and piano. This programmatic piece was inspired by 19th Century traditional ballroom dances. Though inspired by an older form of dance, the air of the piece is modal and untraditional in rhythm and technique. Movement I: The Grand March has its usual characteristic beginning; however, it loses this quality slowly as the violin and clarinet begin to disagree on which key the melody should be. This movement is very programmatic between these parts and the effect is purposely obvious. In that way this movement is the less serious of the three. It portrays more of a corny joke on how overly sophisticated individuals would argue while trying to make their presence known. Movement II: Waltz – The Waltz takes on a more serious turn and is the slow movement of the three. It begins with a simple ostinato plucked by the violin in the uneasy phrygian mode. This movement depicts the more serious side of young single individual at all a ball. Who should he ask to dance? The beginning nervousness turns into his heart racing and more uneasy as the purposed character asks a girl to dance with him. Then the piece becomes more beautiful, though still melodic, in the B section as he and she begin to become very found of one another. Lastly, they are then thrown back into reality and nervousness as they realize the dance is about to end. Movement III: Cotillion – Cotillion is a very freelance improvisatory dance with sashays across the dance floor and more intimate positions. This movement follows according to that original style. With sashays being depicted in the piano from time to time, this movement leaves moments for the instrumentalists to show off their virtuosity; just like dancers would at a ball. The instrumentalists also have intimate moments as the parts are often in unison or octaves, have elegant duets, or are in cannon together as they play simple playful melodies.