Title

Bloodmeal Identification of Culex pipiens Mosquitoes in San Joaquin Country

Poster Number

31

Lead Author Major

Sports Medicine, Pre-Pharmacy, Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Tara Thiemann

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Culex pipiens mosquitoes have been identified as one of the primary vectors for transmitting West Nile virus (WNV), a zoonotic disease spanning North America causing flu-like symptoms, and sometimes death, in humans. To further understand the spread of WNV, it is critical to discover which species of mammals or birds are being targeted for bloodmeals. Culex pipiens mosquitoes were collected in San Joaquin County between August 2009 and November 2012 by dry ice carbon dioxide-baited traps. The bloodmeals were isolated by separating the abdomen of the mosquito from the head and thorax. The DNA from the bloodmeal was extracted, and a 658-base pair region of DNA located in the mitochondrial gene cytochrome coxidase I (COI) was amplified. This was followed by DNA sequencing of the PCR product using the dideoxy chain termination method. Sequences obtained were submitted to BoldSystems© in order to identify the organism fed upon by a given mosquito. A total of 90 mosquitoes have been identified thus far, and their bloodmeals belonged to 32 vertebrate species across 12 habitats, mostly in riparian zones followed by residential and agricultural environments. The results show that the Cx. pipiens mosquitoes fed primarily upon American Robins (17.8%), House Finches (12.2%), and Western Scrub-Jays (10%). This data begins to show how environmental conditions and species diversity influence the feeding patterns of Cx. pipiens to explain the transmission of WNV in California.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

26-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

26-4-2014 4:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 2:00 PM Apr 26th, 4:00 PM

Bloodmeal Identification of Culex pipiens Mosquitoes in San Joaquin Country

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Culex pipiens mosquitoes have been identified as one of the primary vectors for transmitting West Nile virus (WNV), a zoonotic disease spanning North America causing flu-like symptoms, and sometimes death, in humans. To further understand the spread of WNV, it is critical to discover which species of mammals or birds are being targeted for bloodmeals. Culex pipiens mosquitoes were collected in San Joaquin County between August 2009 and November 2012 by dry ice carbon dioxide-baited traps. The bloodmeals were isolated by separating the abdomen of the mosquito from the head and thorax. The DNA from the bloodmeal was extracted, and a 658-base pair region of DNA located in the mitochondrial gene cytochrome coxidase I (COI) was amplified. This was followed by DNA sequencing of the PCR product using the dideoxy chain termination method. Sequences obtained were submitted to BoldSystems© in order to identify the organism fed upon by a given mosquito. A total of 90 mosquitoes have been identified thus far, and their bloodmeals belonged to 32 vertebrate species across 12 habitats, mostly in riparian zones followed by residential and agricultural environments. The results show that the Cx. pipiens mosquitoes fed primarily upon American Robins (17.8%), House Finches (12.2%), and Western Scrub-Jays (10%). This data begins to show how environmental conditions and species diversity influence the feeding patterns of Cx. pipiens to explain the transmission of WNV in California.