Title

A Statistical Analysis of Operation Ceasefire

Poster Number

4

Lead Author Major

Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Michelle Amaral

Faculty Mentor Department

Economics

Abstract/Artist Statement

As municipalities stretch to serve their community with fewer resources, governments have begun to explore alternative options when it comes to fighting crime. With departments fiscally unable to hire more sworn officers, police departments have switched to targeted enforcement strategies rather than direct assaults on crime. Operation Ceasefire is one of the primary strategies being adopted by cities around the country. Utilizing a combination of public reach-out campaigns and targeted police action, Operation Ceasefire has been credited with reducing violent crime in cities such as Cincinnati and Boston. However, the question remains if these target enforcement strategies actually work. As these strategies are rarely introduced in a controlled setting, the effectiveness of Operation Ceasefire remains in question. Using panel data analysis, the crime rates of several California cities that adopted Operation Ceasefire were compared to the crime rates of California cities that did not. By analyzing crime trends before and after the implementation of Operation Ceasefire, this paper will attempt to measure the effectiveness of this enforcement strategy.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

26-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

26-4-2014 4:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 2:00 PM Apr 26th, 4:00 PM

A Statistical Analysis of Operation Ceasefire

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

As municipalities stretch to serve their community with fewer resources, governments have begun to explore alternative options when it comes to fighting crime. With departments fiscally unable to hire more sworn officers, police departments have switched to targeted enforcement strategies rather than direct assaults on crime. Operation Ceasefire is one of the primary strategies being adopted by cities around the country. Utilizing a combination of public reach-out campaigns and targeted police action, Operation Ceasefire has been credited with reducing violent crime in cities such as Cincinnati and Boston. However, the question remains if these target enforcement strategies actually work. As these strategies are rarely introduced in a controlled setting, the effectiveness of Operation Ceasefire remains in question. Using panel data analysis, the crime rates of several California cities that adopted Operation Ceasefire were compared to the crime rates of California cities that did not. By analyzing crime trends before and after the implementation of Operation Ceasefire, this paper will attempt to measure the effectiveness of this enforcement strategy.