Title

Hierarchies of a Golf Course: Looking at Race, Class, and Gender Reproduction

Lead Author Major

Sociology

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Alison Alkon

Faculty Mentor Department

Sociology

Abstract/Artist Statement

How are hierarchies of race, class, and gender reproduced at a golf course? This paper analyzes what golf courses have done for their members, employees, and affiliates in relation to their current condition within each golf course. In this paper I argue that the creation of the golf community has developed historical hierarchies of status through race, class, and gender as the criteria for perpetuating the promotion, employment, and everyday social interactions at golf courses. This argument is based on six weeks of participant observation during the summer of 2013, a review of recent literature, and two years of employment at a golf course in Stockton, California. Due to a rigorous work schedule as the golf car mechanic and head of maintenance, I used an ethnographic approach to obtain my findings. Drawing on these everyday interactions and recent literature, my findings shed light on how racism, classism, and sexism are reproduced to create a collective order that maintains social hierarchies in golf and other sports.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

26-4-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

26-4-2014 4:40 PM

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Apr 26th, 1:00 PM Apr 26th, 4:40 PM

Hierarchies of a Golf Course: Looking at Race, Class, and Gender Reproduction

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

How are hierarchies of race, class, and gender reproduced at a golf course? This paper analyzes what golf courses have done for their members, employees, and affiliates in relation to their current condition within each golf course. In this paper I argue that the creation of the golf community has developed historical hierarchies of status through race, class, and gender as the criteria for perpetuating the promotion, employment, and everyday social interactions at golf courses. This argument is based on six weeks of participant observation during the summer of 2013, a review of recent literature, and two years of employment at a golf course in Stockton, California. Due to a rigorous work schedule as the golf car mechanic and head of maintenance, I used an ethnographic approach to obtain my findings. Drawing on these everyday interactions and recent literature, my findings shed light on how racism, classism, and sexism are reproduced to create a collective order that maintains social hierarchies in golf and other sports.