Title

LGBT the final frontier of human rights: A case study of same-sex marriage in Spain

Lead Author Major

International Relations

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Analiese Richard

Faculty Mentor Department

International Relations

Abstract/Artist Statement

In the short time period between 1975 and 2005, radical changes took place in Spanish society. In just 30 years, Spanish culture underwent a fundamental transformation from the Franco tolerant Spain: a state that has legalized same-sex marriage and embraced the LGBT movement to an extent paralleled by few. The case of LGBT rights in Spain is particularly interesting because of this historical context. Based on archival research and interviews with LGBT activists in Madrid, Spain, I argue that there are 5 primary conditions of possibility that set the historical stage for the legal and cultural acceptance of marriage equality. They are: the emergence of the LGBT community as a visible sector of society, the concerted struggle of certain LGBT activist groups (namely FELGTB), the presence of a multi-party system, the nature of the Spanish “Catholic culture” after Franco, and the way in which normative Spanish values and shared beliefs were transformed as a reaction to the dictatorship and its long-awaited end in 1975. The LGBT community is currently one of the most marginalized communities in the world. Yet, a huge step has been taken to acknowledge this marginalized sector of society, in Spain. Presenting my research is important, firstly because it will make known the intricate factors that made Spain’s success possible. Secondly, because it has the potential to aid LGBT communities in the United States and worldwide in their fight for equality both in legal and cultural contexts.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

26-4-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

26-4-2014 4:40 PM

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Apr 26th, 1:00 PM Apr 26th, 4:40 PM

LGBT the final frontier of human rights: A case study of same-sex marriage in Spain

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

In the short time period between 1975 and 2005, radical changes took place in Spanish society. In just 30 years, Spanish culture underwent a fundamental transformation from the Franco tolerant Spain: a state that has legalized same-sex marriage and embraced the LGBT movement to an extent paralleled by few. The case of LGBT rights in Spain is particularly interesting because of this historical context. Based on archival research and interviews with LGBT activists in Madrid, Spain, I argue that there are 5 primary conditions of possibility that set the historical stage for the legal and cultural acceptance of marriage equality. They are: the emergence of the LGBT community as a visible sector of society, the concerted struggle of certain LGBT activist groups (namely FELGTB), the presence of a multi-party system, the nature of the Spanish “Catholic culture” after Franco, and the way in which normative Spanish values and shared beliefs were transformed as a reaction to the dictatorship and its long-awaited end in 1975. The LGBT community is currently one of the most marginalized communities in the world. Yet, a huge step has been taken to acknowledge this marginalized sector of society, in Spain. Presenting my research is important, firstly because it will make known the intricate factors that made Spain’s success possible. Secondly, because it has the potential to aid LGBT communities in the United States and worldwide in their fight for equality both in legal and cultural contexts.